This step is easier with two people. Start by measuring the length of the ceiling then cut the amount of straw cladding you need – allow a 5cm surplus.  You will need two lengths.  While one person holds the straw cladding in place the other can nail it in place. Hit the nail in until secure then hammer it at a 90-degree angle so it holds the straw cladding in place.  Put nails in every 15-20 cm to secure.
The shed we built rests on a foundation made up of 12 solid-concrete blocks. The 4 x 8 x 16-in. blocks are arranged in three rows spaced 59 in. apart. These blocks are typically set directly on the ground, but we put down a 4-in. bed of gravel first because our site occasionally receives groundwater. The gravel will keep the soil beneath the shed from eroding or becoming soggy.
When building the floor frame, which includes the mudsill, floor joists and perimeter band joists, use 2 x 6 or 2 x 8 pressure-treated lumber. Many prefab sheds use untreated construction-grade lumber for the floor frame, which is fine--if you plan to keep your shed indoors. Even in ideal conditions on the perfect site, a shed floor will be exposed to some moisture, and in time, untreated lumber will rot.
First and foremost, you will want to construct an ornate case to serve as your liquor cabinet. This should be easily accessible to whomever may be fulfilling the function of makeshift bartender. Secondly, a handcrafted station should be installed in a fashion that is inviting to all guests. L-shaped formats can help you cram in tons of extra company, but horizontal rows are equally alluring. When it comes to the counter tops, any composition will do. Just make sure the surface matches the stools.
the biggest problem I had was that the instructions I downloaded from the manufactures web site had a different cut list than the documents that came with the kits. I had already cut the lumber based on the downloaded list so I was dismayed to find that two of the lengths specified in the packaging were longer than the ones I cut from the downloaded plans. I did try assembling an arch with both specs, but nether of the lengths resulted in an arch that actually matched the frame. I wound up forcing things to fit and got the framing up, but it was much harder than it looked and you need at least three people to put it all together.
When indoor and garage storage isn't enough, sheds are a perfect way to introduce organization to your backyard—and to your life. Available in a wide variety of materials, styles and sizes, there is one certain to meet every need and price point. We found some stylish examples, beginning with this Little Garden shed with double-hung windows and Dutch door entrance. Available at Family Home Plans. 
This is nothing flashy or classy. Its paint is peeling, its roof is rusting, and its luster is gone. It looks drab to the eye looking for the latest and the greatest. However there remains some beauty. It may be hidden to the modern eye, but it is still there. It speaks of the glories of time past. It has the revered gothic style windows with their inspiring, curved and pointed arch. The roof has a delightfully rustic look that speaks of something that has been around for a long time and deserves to be cherished. The paint may be old and peeling but it is not meaningless. Rustic garden sheds may be old but they speak of having weathered many storms. This is aged beauty that will not disappear right away. So for the first IDEA: Reuse and enjoy oldness rather than getting rid of it.
I even have a friend whose parents have a bar shed. They don’t call it that, and I never realized it until writing this article, but it’s the size, shape, and build of a standard shed, located near their pool. It houses all of the pool supplies, alongside a nice 4-person bar, a beer fridge, and a sizable selection of liquor. It was right in front of my eyes all this time. I just never really thought of it as a bar shed.
This is another example of surroundings that fit with the garden shed. Actually, it would be more accurate to say that the shed blends and fits with its surroundings. The dark colors blend with the woody area and the darker mulch. The green trim has enough of green to connect at least somewhat with the greenery around it. IDEA # 27: Make your shed blend with nature instead of change the natural setting to fit your shed.

These sheds are perfect for small yards where space is scarce. If you plan on storing large items inside, make sure to install double doors. On the other hand, if you want to design it like a very small office, one door is enough. Lean-to sheds are generally used for storing tools like nails, screws, electric drills, gardening equipment etc., basically anything that fits. Lean-to sheds can be placed in close proximity to your house or other existing structure.


Since outdoor space is limited in a big city, everyone knows you must make smart use of vertical real estate. For a greenhouse/shed in San Francisco's Bernal Heights, Step 3 Studio designed in open-framework structure that provides shelter for a garden shed that stores potting materials and plants on the ground floor. A steel staircase was built on site, which leads to a second level surfaced in steel grid mesh. The higher elevation is the perfect spot for container plants that require more sun. It's also a nice place to hang out and enjoy views of the city, day or night.
When building a solid-concrete block foundation, it’s important that all the blocks be level. However, it’s equally important that the blocks in each row be perfectly aligned. The best — and fastest — way to line up the blocks is with a taut string. Install the first and last block in each row. Then stretch a length of mason’s line along the edge of the two end blocks and use it as a guide to set the intermediate blocks..
I am considering purchasing a 16×24 Everest Tall Barn and using it as a workshop/additional living space to include a full bathroom. For this reason, I am planning to run utilities to the building including natural gas, water, sewer, etc. Since there is no way of knowing where the floor joists will be, there is no way to know where to locate the sewer line for proper flow (connection location) through a concrete slab. Therefore, I was hoping to have a standard footer with craw space installed and attached the Everest on top of it (just like a house). This way I could access the utilities by removing sections of the floor so I could run the sewer line (and other utilities) to exact areas of the building. Is it possible to have the building constructed/attached on top of this type of footer system?
This is one of the bigger (and more costly) DIYs I’ve ever wanted to do, so I’m going to have some first-time learning curves ahead. Also, obviously, it’s something I’ve had to save up for. If you’ve noticed the increase in my sponsored projects on the site over the last few months, this is one of the main reasons I’ve taken them on (the summer is usually when I wind up working with more sponsors, so I wanted to funnel some of that to immediately start planning for this!). I’ve already seen what the kinds of costs are to have one custom built by ordering, so I’m hoping the DIY is also going to be more budget-friendly.
If you do not have a lot of bulky gardening equipment, but would still like to protect and store your standard tools, acquiring a smaller shed may be the best bet for you. This convenient space will provide shelter for all the gardening essentials and will help you keep all your tools organized. What a great feeling to know that all your tools are going to be organized within the same space and you do not have to go out and hunt for them all.
A Place to Grow recycles greenhouses to create she sheds, wine rooms, art studios, and meditation retreats. For a client in Los Osos, California, a shed is used as a sewing room and private escape. When designing studios and hobby sheds, allow room for shelving, storage, and workspace. Naturally, the space will need to be wired for proper lighting.
Not only can your shed blend with nature or even be made out of natural products. It can also be made out of the actual raw products nature provides. Wood is natural but it is often cut up. At the least it is debarked and cut so it fits together. However this shed is made of the products that are exactly the way nature gives it, namely in their original form. IDEA: Try building a shed from materials that you do not have to alter at all.
This lean-to shed features clapboard style siding which is not only easy to install but provides exceptional resistance to rain, wind, and snow. While you can build your shed from brand-new lumber, you could also opt to save money by building your shed from used lumber. The doors appear to be made from tongue and groove lumber but could also be made from pre-grooved plywood sheets that give the same appearance for far less money.
Cut the treated 6x6s to 12 ft. and set them on the gravel so they’re parallel and the outside edges are 6 ft. apart. On sloped ground, you’ll have to raise the 6×6 on the low side until it’s level with the adjacent 6×6. Do this by stacking treated 2x6s, 4x6s or 6x6s on top of the treated 6×6 to reach the right height. Use a 4-ft. or longer level to make sure the 6x6s are level and level with each other. Finally, square the 6x6s by adjusting the position of one 6×6. Slide the 6×6 back and forth, not sideways, until the diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Build the platform with treated 2x6s, 24 in. on center, and cover it with treated 3/4-in. plywood (Figure B).
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