Shed foundations fall into two basic categories: on-grade and frost-proof. On-grade foundations (sometimes called “floating foundations” — that’s this kind, not this kind) sit right on the ground and are sufficient for all but the very largest outbuildings. They’re also the quickest and simplest to build because they don’t require you to dig deep holes or pour concrete footings or piers. On-grade foundations are usually made of pressure-treated lumber or solid-concrete blocks.
Concrete requires 3” (7.5 cm) of compacted hardcore (all-in ballast or other crushed rubble/gravel) underneath the 3″ concrete layer. The base can be level with the ground or raised above it. If you want it to be level, excavate the top earth to 6” (15 cm), to allow for the hardcore layer and 3” (7.5 cm) of concrete. Level the area with a rake and spade and remove the pegs.

I placed the screws about 8 inches apart throughout the layout of the floor.  For the plywood ends that butt up against each other, I install two screws on each piece exactly next to each other.  I then used some of the leftover dirt I had and back filled the sides of the frame.  Finally, I tamped the edges with my hand tamper at a slight angle so water will deflect away from the floor.
If there’s even the slightest chance that you may someday want to move your shed to another location, make the job easier by modifying the skids before you set them in place. Start by trimming off the bottom corners of the skids at a 45-degree angle so they’ll slide more easily over the ground. Also, bore a 1 1/2-in.-dia. hole about 4 in. from each end. That way, you’ll have a convenient place to hook up a tow chain or steel cable.
The next step after installing deck boards on the front porch is to build the attic floor. The 2×8 joists covered with sheets of flooring material provide storage space in the attic. We left a 4-ft.-wide opening for easy access to the front and back loft areas, but you could also cover the entire area with a floor and provide an access door or pull-down ladder instead.

Hello, I plan on purchasing the 16×24 two story Everest and converting into livable cabin. I am in process of demolishing dilapidated cabin currently on site and then plan on installing footer and concrete slab. There will be 1 bathroom and small kitchen on 1st floor. Do you have any recommendations for slab (4 inch vs. 6 inch)? Any thoughts on best way to run piping? Should I give slab installer any specific directions (anchors, etc.)? Does slab need to be exactly 16×24 or should it be slightly larger? Do I need to send the schematic I prepared showing location of windows and doors?
There are several ways to economize when building a shed: Install three-tab roof shingles instead of architectural shingles, or use grooved-plywood siding in place of cedar bevel siding. But don't ever skimp on the building materials used for the floor frame or plywood floor deck. I can't tell you how often I've walked into a shed and found the floor to be dangerously spongy. One building in particular had a floor so badly rotted it felt like one of those inflatable moonwalk attractions you see at carnivals.
We, at Overholt & Sons, have done some research to gather some of the best garden shed photos out there. From our hours of looking, we have compiled a list of 30 exceptional and interesting photos. We set them apart, not as the only ideas and photos, but as some of the best. We intended to set these 30 photos apart from the rest of the noise for your inspiration, enjoyment, and enrichment.

Also, sheds are usually made of wood. But you can change that too if you have a more elaborate plan for your garden shed. This is a particularly imposing shed with cedar-shake siding and shingles and a brick exterior, mortared stone steps and a large door with matching windows. It’s a beautiful getaway and you don’t even have to go far to reach it.


Many sheds come with floor bearers already fixed to the underside. These are smaller timber bearers - usually 3 x 2 inches - that run perpendicular to the timbers of your wooden frame. If yours doesn’t, it’s worth adding some (at intervals of 16 to 24 inches) to allow air to circulate and prevent damp. Just fix them to the base before you start building your shed.

This outdoor structure is a little bit of both: you have a small storage space to the right and a cozy space to the left where you can place a few chairs and watch the rain pour on your garden or look at the stars, since part of the roof is made of glass. The disadvantage is that it’s not going to be cheap to build considering it’s a pretty specific design.
Start by setting deck blocks on the ground, positioned as shown in the plans. While the area doesn’t have to be perfectly level, you should make the ground roughly level where each block will rest. Temporarily place some straight 2-by-6 lumber on edge in the top grooves of the blocks to orient the blocks in a straight line. Arrange two rows of four blocks parallel to each other to form both long walls, then measure diagonally across the outside corners to determine how square the arrangement is. If the two long walls are parallel, and diagonal measurements taken across corners are equal, then each corner is guaranteed to be 90 degrees. Finish up by placing one deck block in the middle of each 6-foot wall after you have aligned and squared the 8-foot walls.

Note: Here’s how we can help: 24hplans has team of highly-trained, professional architects and drafters who can prepare any kind of site plan in the shortest amount of time possible, so that you can easily obtain that building permit and get on with your project. Use the promotion code: 24hplans-20off to get a 20% discount off any package. — Please note this is a limited time offer, exclusive to the readers of our blog. This offer is not being advertised anywhere else.
Note: Here’s how we can help: 24hplans has team of highly-trained, professional architects and drafters who can prepare any kind of site plan in the shortest amount of time possible, so that you can easily obtain that building permit and get on with your project. Use the promotion code: 24hplans-20off to get a 20% discount off any package. — Please note this is a limited time offer, exclusive to the readers of our blog. This offer is not being advertised anywhere else.
Typically, lean to sheds are a structure that you would not want to attach permantly to say your garage or other part of your house! Why? Well, damage can be caused to your permanent structure due to shifting and the like, and also attaching a structure to your home will require you to get a permit (you may have to anyway!) but anything you build that you attach to your home most typically requires a permit.
Not sure what to do with the old shed you aren’t using for storage? Refurbish it and turn it into a bar space! This is a fantastic idea for the couple that loves to entertain or the house on the block that is notorious for throwing parties. It is such a cute idea and given there are so many great ideas out there, you can easily turn the space into a chic bar area in no time.
If you have the do-it-yourself skills and an open timeframe, check out the various plans available online or for purchase. Make sure you thoroughly understand the instructions and actually have the ability and tools to do the job. Other sources for sheds include prefabricated buildings that you would order from a reputable company and kits. Some include pre-cut lumber that is shipped to your house. Before ordering, find out if additional milling, drilling, or cutting will be needed, along with necessary tools.
First and foremost, you will want to construct an ornate case to serve as your liquor cabinet. This should be easily accessible to whomever may be fulfilling the function of makeshift bartender. Secondly, a handcrafted station should be installed in a fashion that is inviting to all guests. L-shaped formats can help you cram in tons of extra company, but horizontal rows are equally alluring. When it comes to the counter tops, any composition will do. Just make sure the surface matches the stools.
I'm always surprised at how little forethought most backyard builders give to the shed's doors. After all, there's no sense in building a shed to store a particular item, such as a lawn tractor or wheelbarrow, if you can't fit it through the door. I saw a shed recently that had its doors removed. When I asked why, the homeowner explained that he framed the doorway wide enough for his riding lawnmower, but didn't take into account the amount of space taken up by the hinged inset doors. So, he had to remove the doors to fit the mower inside. (He's in the market for a skinnier mower.)
Check with your local building department to see whether a permit is required. Also find out if there are rules about where your pub shed can be located on the lot. Take the Materials List (in the project pdfs below) with you to your favorite lumberyard or home center and go over the list with the salesperson to see what items you may have to order. Then set up a delivery so you’ll be ready to build the pub shed when your help arrives. A few days before you plan to dig, call 811 for instructions on how to locate buried utility lines. Now it’s time to start building your pub shed.

If there’s even the slightest chance that you may someday want to move your shed to another location, make the job easier by modifying the skids before you set them in place. Start by trimming off the bottom corners of the skids at a 45-degree angle so they’ll slide more easily over the ground. Also, bore a 1 1/2-in.-dia. hole about 4 in. from each end. That way, you’ll have a convenient place to hook up a tow chain or steel cable.
Figure G (in Additional Information below) shows details for the marking jig. Photo 12 shows how to use this setup to draw the curves for the window pieces. Next cut the side pieces (Figure F, in Additional Information below). Set the side pieces in place over the top of the header and mark the angled cuts (Photo 13). Finish the curved trim piece by first cutting the angles on each end, and then sawing the curves with a jigsaw and sanding them smooth. Use the marking jig to lay out the curved brace, too (Figure G, in Additional Information below).

How about scouring the river for a few days to gather wood for a shed? That may sound like a ridiculous and like one of those cool shed ideas. However, it is cheap, out-of-the-box, and likely a possibility for a unique and very rustic garden centerpiece. It may not be classy but why does it need to be. It is definitely an idea with potential for a different kind of beauty. IDEA: Gather some driftwood and turn it into a rustically beautiful garden shed

The design of the shed you choose will depend on what you will be using it for and were it will be located. If you just need a small shed to place garden equipment, a lean to shed can be ideal. This design of shed will not take much room and it can be placed next to a fence or wall. The lean to shed has a single sloped roof design. It is one of the most common for garden tools as well as pool equipment and chemicals.
Typically, lean to sheds are a structure that you would not want to attach permantly to say your garage or other part of your house! Why? Well, damage can be caused to your permanent structure due to shifting and the like, and also attaching a structure to your home will require you to get a permit (you may have to anyway!) but anything you build that you attach to your home most typically requires a permit.
Double-check the corners and the front posts to make sure they’re plumb. Then cut and install the 4 x 8-ft. sheets of siding. Measure and cut the siding panels so that the seams align over wall studs. Rest the bottom of the panels on a temporary 1/2-in. spacer to provide space between the siding and the drip cap. Nail the siding to the studs. Follow the siding manufacturer’s instructions for spacing and nailing the siding.

This foundation consists of little more than a rectangular wooden frame sitting on a gravel bed. The shed walls are built on the frame, and the entire weight of the building is transferred directly to the ground. However, the real advantage with this type of foundation is that you get to choose from a variety of flooring options. The floor area within the timber frame could be filled with gravel, concrete, crushed granite, marble chips, or slabs of bluestone or slate. Another flooring option is to nail pressure-treated 2x6s over the frame in a manner similar to that of a deck. Just keep in mind that the 2x6s must be installed before you erect the shed walls.
 If you do not require a shed floor it would be advisable at this stage to add a damp proof membrane, this can be laid on top of the hardcore ready for the concrete. A concrete mix of 5 parts ballast and 1 part cement should now be mixed and poured into the area, enough concrete should be poured so that it is just proud of the formwork. It can now be tampered down level and flat using a straight piece of solid timber. The result should be a smooth level concrete base - the ultimate shed base.
Many sheds come with floor bearers already fixed to the underside. These are smaller timber bearers - usually 3 x 2 inches - that run perpendicular to the timbers of your wooden frame. If yours doesn’t, it’s worth adding some (at intervals of 16 to 24 inches) to allow air to circulate and prevent damp. Just fix them to the base before you start building your shed.
The next step after installing deck boards on the front porch is to build the attic floor. The 2×8 joists covered with sheets of flooring material provide storage space in the attic. We left a 4-ft.-wide opening for easy access to the front and back loft areas, but you could also cover the entire area with a floor and provide an access door or pull-down ladder instead.
This little cottage of dreams has an adorable story behind it. These crafters were in need of a workshop and noticed their neighbor getting rid of his small unattached garage, so they inquired about it, before getting some friends and transporting the whole structure to their backyard, where they gave it a complete makeover. Neighborly interactions, a helpful gang of friends, and a cute, flowery cottage? It's almost too good to be true!
This shed is quite simple but with complex decoration. It started with a simple shed shell. Then some really nice windows and doors were added. Plus it was mulched nicely. In addition a number of little knick-knacks decorate the shed. The shed is simple and modern yet tastefully done. IDEA: Buy a simple shed shell and decorate it exotically with flowers, mulching, and more.
Since this is going to be a much bigger project, it will be isolated as its own series (look for “Pub Shed” as the category on posts for updates). As you guys might have seen in some of my Instagram shares or updates about the back yard, I’ve already begun the process to try to make it into a reality. More specific details (now that I’ve actually announced the first round of plans with this post) will be upcoming, including building the base (it’s not fully “in” yet, so that will have its own post when it is).
This side shed is a great way to store simple stuff, such as the lawn mower or your garden tools. It almost blends into the scene with the toy beside it and the rich foliage next to it. It is unobtrusive but quite functional, as it will prevent so many tools from either rusting in the rain or being baked in the sun. Overall, these sheds can save you money since all of your garden essentials will be protected.
Crosscut the remaining joists and fasten them, as noted in the diagram, with joist hangers, joist hanger nails, 16d common nails, or 3½-inch deck screws. Crosscut the floor pieces and screw them to the long and short joists. Make yourself a small jig from scrap lumber to speed accurate spacing between each piece of flooring. Even better, make two. Place one at the front and another at the rear of each deck piece. Fasten the deck pieces with the jig in place. Lift the jigs out, position the next piece of decking, and repeat.

Not only can your shed blend with nature or even be made out of natural products. It can also be made out of the actual raw products nature provides. Wood is natural but it is often cut up. At the least it is debarked and cut so it fits together. However this shed is made of the products that are exactly the way nature gives it, namely in their original form. IDEA: Try building a shed from materials that you do not have to alter at all.

Mark the position of the rafters along the beams at 16-inch centers and carefully nail them in place. We even went so far as to set each nailhead to firmly pinch the rafter down against the beam. We nailed the front fascia in place and moved on to the skip sheathing for the roofing. Note that two pieces of sheathing are nailed on at the peak and at the base. The rest are spaced evenly between them.


Also square the frame by making sure diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Then tack one corner to hold it square. Finally, nail the soffit to the roof frame with 6d galvanized box nails. We used 12-in.-wide fiber cement siding for soffit material. Mount an inexpensive carbide blade on your circular saw to cut the fiber cement. Set the roof panel aside and build the other half of the roof using the same techniques.
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