Once the concrete has cured, set a post on top of the footer. Use the intersection of the mason's string to set the post square. Making sure the post is plumb — and holding it straight — add concrete around the sides and cover with soil. Brace each post to keep it in position while the concrete sets. Watch our video How Do I Set a Post in Concrete? for an illustration of bracing.
The blocks measure 8 in. wide by 16 in. long and come in 4-in.- and 2-in.-thick units. The thicker blocks are placed first, with the thinner “patio” blocks laid on top when you need to raise one block even with the others. In some cases, you may need to stack two or three 4-in. blocks on top of each other to raise the lowest corner of the foundation so it is even with the highest corner.
In addition to common building materials that you’ll find at most home centers and lumberyards, we used some special products from Louisiana-Pacific (in-depth material details in project pdfs below) that you may have to order if you want to duplicate our pub shed exactly. The windows are shop built using plastic utility window sash that we found at a local home center. Search for “barn sash” online if you can’t find it locally. The swing-up bar door is site built. The entry door on the side is a standard prehung exterior door that’s readily available at most home centers (about $220). The materials for the pub shed cost us about $6,500.
Dig trenches about 12 in. wide and about 10 in. below where you want the bottom edge of the joists to end up. Pour 4 in. of gravel into the trenches and level it off. Make sure the gravel in all three trenches is at the same height. Then cut the 6x6s to 12 ft. long and set them in the trenches. Measure to make sure  the 6x6s are parallel. Then measure diagonally from the ends of the outside 6x6s to make certain they’re square. The diagonal measurements should be equal. Finally, level the 6x6s (Photo above and Figure B in project pdfs).

Not only can your shed blend with nature or even be made out of natural products. It can also be made out of the actual raw products nature provides. Wood is natural but it is often cut up. At the least it is debarked and cut so it fits together. However this shed is made of the products that are exactly the way nature gives it, namely in their original form. IDEA: Try building a shed from materials that you do not have to alter at all.

I’m looking at putting a 10 x 12 shed in our back yard (Michigan). I’m wondering what would be recommended – if anything – for a base. It looks like, from the installation process photos, that the builder will assemble the foundation and can put that directly onto the grass. Our ground is level enough – within the 6″ required – so I don’t think that would be an issue. It sounds like – from what i am reading – that I wouldn’t NEED to do anything to prepare in terms of putting down stone or anything. Is that correct?
Are you against the idea of a treehouse because you fear for your kids’ safety? Then, here’s the solution. If you don’t want them to hate you ever since their childhood (they’ll have plenty of occasions later on), you’ll buy a nice shed and you will paint it to turn the construction into a beautiful playhouse for your children. The shed in this photo was actually turned into a playhouse for 2 little girls.
Water is wood's worst enemy. Given the right circumstance and enough time, excessive moisture can rot framing, warp floors and doors, corrode hinges and breed mold and mildew. Fortunately, there's an easy remedy. First, be sure that the lowest wood member--the mudsill--is at least 6 in. above the ground. That's sufficient space to allow fresh air to circulate under the shed.
Is there have a bunch of old materials laying around that could be put to good use? A few cool shed ideas, can turn even seemingly useless materials into a great backyard garden shed. Plus it can be done cheaply. With some old windows, used pallets, and even driftwood, plus a host of other retired materials, these garden shed ideas can bring your backyard garden to life.

This tiny office space is perfect for those times you need to get away and focus on some important work. Whether you are a work-from-home person or an individual that has a freelance side gig, it is always great to have a space that is just for you and getting your work done. Once you have created this space, your mindset will automatically be in work mode every time you enter it.
This garden hut shed is practically growing into the scenery. The hut is sheer nature, as depicted by the garden growing off the roof of the structure. This shed has undoubtedly been in this surrounding for a while, but that does not diminish the function of it. If anything, the charm of this shed surpasses the time this tiny shed has probably spent on this hillside.

Phase # one: Talked about previously mentioned earlier determine where you can spot your get rid of inside an optimum area, allow enough distance from hedges or partitions for straightforward access to the sides. Use pegs and twine to attract out your foundation 2 inches (5 centimetres) larger than the location from the developing on either side. Finally, a figure out angled to guarantee the spot is square.
This wood shed plan keeps wood open and dry and easy to access. This sort of open firewood shed is good if you live in a place where it stays fairly dry in the winter. If you have a lot of snow, it might be an issue. But overall, this simple, sturdy design of a storage shed plan is a great start. You can easily store a full cord or more in this size of shed.
Search the hashtage #vintagetrailers on Instagram and you'll discover some 80,000 images of big, small, and mid-sized aluminum travel trailers from roughly the 1950s to 1970s. You might find gleaming silver Airstreams at a lodging rental in Joshua Tree or parked temporarily at a campground near Yellowstone. One trend that hasn't lost steam is the backyard she-shed trailer escape, a dolled-up adult playhouse where women--or men--can escape for alone time or to hang out with friends and a bottle or two of wine.  There's even a Vintage Trailer Magazine for enthusiasts. This vintage Aljo trailer rests in the backyard of a house in Pasadena, California.
The next step after installing deck boards on the front porch is to build the attic floor. The 2×8 joists covered with sheets of flooring material provide storage space in the attic. We left a 4-ft.-wide opening for easy access to the front and back loft areas, but you could also cover the entire area with a floor and provide an access door or pull-down ladder instead.
There are two 4×4 posts at the front of the shed that support the front half of the roof. Secure the bottom of the posts to the deck frame with metal post anchors. Tie the top of the posts together with the second (top) 2×4 plates that run over the top of the walls. Miter the ends of the 2×4 plates over the posts and attach them with screws (Photo above).
This backyard shed doubles as a romantic farmhouse. Unlike a typical farmhouse, this shed oozes all things romantic, from the cut out hearts to the rustic feel. It would be hard not to fall in love with this cozy little shack, as it is adorable to admire and probably even more fun to be in. This would make the perfect, quaint addition to an outdoor garden party area.
Once the concrete has cured, set a post on top of the footer. Use the intersection of the mason's string to set the post square. Making sure the post is plumb — and holding it straight — add concrete around the sides and cover with soil. Brace each post to keep it in position while the concrete sets. Watch our video How Do I Set a Post in Concrete? for an illustration of bracing.
This whimsical garden shed looks like something you would see in a “Lord of the Rings” movie. With its almost twisting structure sitting in the middle of this forest landscape, I am almost surprised I do not see a tiny Hobbit poking about with a pipe in hand. It is a truly gorgeous setup and this just goes to show how versatile these garden sheds can be.
It is very critical to have a dry and level foundation. It is impractical to build a shed on an uneven foundation. This will prevent the wall sections (simple diagrams for making shed from scratch) from fitting into place when you try to secure them to each other. For sheds which will need to hold heavy items, it is recommended to build a concrete foundation. The two most common methods of building the shed foundation are as follows.

Many sheds come with floor bearers already fixed to the underside. These are smaller timber bearers - usually 3 x 2 inches - that run perpendicular to the timbers of your wooden frame. If yours doesn’t, it’s worth adding some (at intervals of 16 to 24 inches) to allow air to circulate and prevent damp. Just fix them to the base before you start building your shed.

In each corner place an L-shaped plate against the inside of the long capping timber close to the spike you’ve just attached: one side against the wood, the other on the ground. Hammer the plate to flatten it against the ground until the top is flush with the timber. Screw the plate to the frame, and repeat for each corner. These L-plates help to keep your shed level.
Once you have a pile of pallet wood start by laying bits of wood on the floor. If you have different sizes and shades then mix them up to get a great effect. Start in the top corner and screw the boards in place using an electric screwdriver with screws long enough to go through the pallet wood and floor of the shed.  You’ll need to cut some pieces to size so use the tape measure to mark the wood then cut using a saw of choice.  Once the floor is down then line all the walls apart from the doors and eaves.
So it's not surprising that people often ask me for advice about putting together a backyard storage building. Sometimes I get asked questions that I couldn't possibly answer: "Do you think my husband and brother-in-law can build me a garden shed?" Or, "Would an 8 x 10-ft. shed be big enough to store all my stuff?" Gee, ma'am, I couldn't say. But often, the questions have something to do with shed design, framing or siding options. There, I can help. And so with these inquisitive souls in mind I present my favorite tricks of the shed trade.
I'm always surprised at how little forethought most backyard builders give to the shed's doors. After all, there's no sense in building a shed to store a particular item, such as a lawn tractor or wheelbarrow, if you can't fit it through the door. I saw a shed recently that had its doors removed. When I asked why, the homeowner explained that he framed the doorway wide enough for his riding lawnmower, but didn't take into account the amount of space taken up by the hinged inset doors. So, he had to remove the doors to fit the mower inside. (He's in the market for a skinnier mower.)
When it comes to building a shed on a budget, one of the best ways to save money is by using reclaimed or recycled wood for every part of it you can. Depending on where you live, (at least in my area) there are always old homes being torn down. Most of this wood is still perfectly usable and is more affordable than buying new. Not only this, but you are doing your part to reduce the number of trees being cut down.
When installing a wooden garden shed you must ensure that you have an even and level surface onto which you can build it. This can be created using either a premade wooden shed base, a plastic shed base, solid concrete, garden slabs or even timber decking. Failing to prepare a level surface will lead to your shed warping, which can result in damaged timber or even broken windows. If you're using one of our shed bases you will still need to clear the area for rubble. It's also a good idea to lay a weed/damp proof membranes, to prevent growth and eventual damage to your shed.
People are often a little dubious about the capabilities of our plastic shed bases, just because they’re plastic. However, they’re stronger than the majority of other bases available and are certainly a whole lot better looking. These base panels can withstand weights of up to 420 tonnes, meaning not only can they take the weight of a shed that’s filled with everything from garden furniture to bikes and barbecues, they can also withstand the weight of a HGV and pretty much anything else you throw at it!
Using wooden pegs and string, mark out the exact base size required, being careful to measure both diagonals in order to get the area square. The is area can now be excavated to a depth of 3". This depth can vary depending on the thickness of slab used and the gradient of the ground excavated. Overall you're looking to achieve a thickness of 4-5cm of sand/cement mix and the slab on top.
The completed base should now be level and square. Conduct a final check with a long straight-edged piece of timber to check if the base is level from each corner. Also, measure the diagonals to finally check that the base is square. Brush off any excess dry sand/cement mix which could hinder the levelling of the shed. The result is a smooth, solid and level base.
Use dimensions from Figure C (in Additional Information below) to snap lines for the peak. Then cut 2x4s to fit inside the lines and toe-screw them to the plywood to hold them in place while you fill in the center studs (Photo 1) and nail on the siding (Photo 2). Toe-screw from the outside so the screws will be accessible after the siding is installed.
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