If you have a router, use a hinge-mortising bit (or straight bit) to cut the hinge recesses (Photo 10). Otherwise, use a sharp chisel. Screw the hinges to the door and trim. To hang the door, line up a temporary 2×4 with the bottom of the siding and screw it to the wall. Then rest the door on the 2×4 and drive 3-in. screws through the trim into the framing to hold the door in place (Photo 11). Finish the door installation by adding the top and side trim pieces.
This garden shed takes its name very seriously. It’s placed in the middle of the garden and stands out with its cute white design. It’s a lovely addition to the landscape and it’s very functional as well. It’s great for storing all the garden tools and it also serves as a comfortable work space and a lovely area for relaxation and for entertaining friends.

Thank you for visiting our blog. Yes, the 16×16 Aspen is a great choice as it offers lots of storage space and overall value. We would recommend footers that are slightly smaller than your typical one car garage. Considering ground movement, you definitely want that slab on a solid foundation to keep from cracking. Yes, the concrete pad can act as a floor with no wood floor needed, the bottom plate has to be a treated material. You’ll want anchor bolts placed in the concrete to place the treated plate to hold the shed to the concrete floor. THe shed is a true 16’x16′, so 192”x192″ are the dimensions. Great questions. Feel free to give us a call at 855.853.8558 if you have any other questions!

A 1964-built Eichler home was bought in original condition with vintage appliances, fixtures, and finishes. The new owners wanted to retain its iconic midcentury modern design, but requested that Gast Architects make some updates to create a calm, light-filled, and inviting home. Gast strived to preserve the signature finishes of the house while creating a larger, more modern kitchen, opening up the floor plan, and updating the master suite. The shed in the backyard repeats the lines of the main house, resembling a mini Eichler.

This shed features plenty of glass to let the sun shine in. Note that it even has windows in the end gables for even more light. The use of both metal and clapboard siding gives this outdoor shed the look of a tiny home, which may help it blend into your backyard more easily. The double glass doors are perfect for letting in more cooling air or large items. This shed would make a great outdoor studio for the artist in the family.


We’ve simplified the door-hanging process by mounting the door to a 1-1/2-in.-thick trim piece and then screwing the trim to the wall. An easy way to mark and cut matching hinge recesses in both the door and the trim is to clamp the trim alongside the door, making sure it extends 1/8 in. beyond the top of the door. Then mark the hinge cutout on both the door and the trim at the same time.


Shed foundations fall into two basic categories: on-grade and frost-proof. On-grade foundations (sometimes called “floating foundations” — that’s this kind, not this kind) sit right on the ground and are sufficient for all but the very largest outbuildings. They’re also the quickest and simplest to build because they don’t require you to dig deep holes or pour concrete footings or piers. On-grade foundations are usually made of pressure-treated lumber or solid-concrete blocks.
Well, not these plans. You have the option of building a very functional and spacious lean-to shed on different foundations. Your foundation choices are: concrete slab, a wooden floor supported by concrete piers, or a wooden floor supported by skids. That lost option also means that your lean-to could be mobile as well so you won’t have to decide where you want to permanently put it.
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