Since this is going to be a much bigger project, it will be isolated as its own series (look for “Pub Shed” as the category on posts for updates). As you guys might have seen in some of my Instagram shares or updates about the back yard, I’ve already begun the process to try to make it into a reality. More specific details (now that I’ve actually announced the first round of plans with this post) will be upcoming, including building the base (it’s not fully “in” yet, so that will have its own post when it is).
Our Free shed plans are aimed more at giving you an idea of what to expect with from the premium plan. For the advanced DIYer, the basic free plans may even be enough to build the full shed. But if you’re a beginner the basic free plan will only act as a guide. In order to get the full step-by-step instructions you would need to invest in one of our premium plans.
Disclaimer: Please note that this guide is intended to present general information regarding the subject. All information indicated are representative and not exhaustive, which means that the results may vary depending on your item, its size, complexity and other circumstances. This is only advice and we do not accept responsibility for any problems you may have whilst following this guide, it is only a representation and not a definitive guide. When in doubt, please ask your manufacturer before proceeding.
Of all the different simple shed designs, this one uses simple stacked lumber siding in which each length of board is laid edge on to the one below it and nailed in place. While this design can be quite strong, unless you seal the gaps between each board with some form of caulking, it might let the rains come in. Once your little girl grows out of it, you can turn it into a dog house, or add plexiglass windows and a door to turn it into a storage shed.
Water is wood's worst enemy. Given the right circumstance and enough time, excessive moisture can rot framing, warp floors and doors, corrode hinges and breed mold and mildew. Fortunately, there's an easy remedy. First, be sure that the lowest wood member--the mudsill--is at least 6 in. above the ground. That's sufficient space to allow fresh air to circulate under the shed.
Also square the frame by making sure diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Then tack one corner to hold it square. Finally, nail the soffit to the roof frame with 6d galvanized box nails. We used 12-in.-wide fiber cement siding for soffit material. Mount an inexpensive carbide blade on your circular saw to cut the fiber cement. Set the roof panel aside and build the other half of the roof using the same techniques.
This tiny little shed has seen some things. This shed looks as if it has been around for a great while. Maybe it was a storage shed at one point, but these days, this tiny shed look as if it is a playhouse for children. Set in a more rural backdrop, this shed pops with color against the brown trees and foliage. It is a perfect space for a child to go and have a tea party with imaginary friends or for a kid playdate.
If there’s even the slightest chance that you may someday want to move your shed to another location, make the job easier by modifying the skids before you set them in place. Start by trimming off the bottom corners of the skids at a 45-degree angle so they’ll slide more easily over the ground. Also, bore a 1 1/2-in.-dia. hole about 4 in. from each end. That way, you’ll have a convenient place to hook up a tow chain or steel cable.

This cottage potting shed takes design cues from the main house, using the same earthy green and white paint colors. Extras like a deck, stone path, and cottage-style mixed planting borders make the backyard shed design feel more like a home than just an outbuilding. Several garden shed decorating ideas, like lace curtains in the windows, a quaint bench, and outdoor art also add homey appeal. In a practical move, downspouts ensure rain doesn’t damage the plants that surround the building.
Using wooden pegs and string, mark out the desired base size adding 2" to each length, for example: for an 8x6 base you would need to string mark 8'2"x6'2". Measure from corner to corner to ensure the area marked out is square. The concrete base cna be level with the surrounding soil or raised above. If you require a level with the ground base you need to excavate the area to a depth of around 6" to allow for 3" of hardcore/sub-base and 3" of concrete. Level the area with a rake and remove the pegs and string. 
Spread the concrete evenly in the shuttering, taking particular care to push the concrete into the corners and edges. Arguably the best method to lay the concrete is to do it a layer at a time and compact it until the shuttering frame is full. Leave the concrete flush with the top of the framework and smooth it out using either a wooden or plastic float.

This backyard shed’s design is a nod to the property’s farmhouse. But beyond its charming shake siding and robin’s egg blue door, the design is practical and savvy. Many of the materials used to build the shed were salvaged from a home renovation. The shed can also be moved, as it is set on concrete piers on gravel and sand instead of a permanent foundation.


Although skids are often set directly on the ground, I prefer to lay them on a bed of gravel. The stone creates a very stable base that’s not likely to settle or wash away. Begin by laying the skids in position on the ground, then mark around each one using spray paint or flour sprinkled from a can. Move the skids out of the way, then use a flat shovel to remove the sod and about 2 in. of soil from the marked areas. Check the excavated areas to make sure they’re close to being level. If they’re not, remove a little more soil from the high spots. Next, add 3 in. to 4 in. of gravel. Compact the gravel with a hand tamper or gas-powered plate compactor, then replace the skids.
This small backyard shed is a minimalist approach to a larger storage facility. Its classic design serves both in function and as a great element to have in a backyard setting. The shed looks sleek, modern and interesting. It does not look like a standard storage shed, so if you were trying to disguise the shed as something else, this would be a great design to execute that.
Omit the bird’s-mouth from four rafters and use these on the ends. Cut the 2x4s for the ridge and subfascia to length and mark the rafter positions on them. Line up the rafters with the marks and nail through the ridge and subfascia with 16d nails to secure them. When the roof frame is complete, line up the subfascia with the chalk line on the platform and tack it in three or four places with toe screws to hold the frame straight while you install the soffit.
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