This shed is quite simple but with complex decoration. It started with a simple shed shell. Then some really nice windows and doors were added. Plus it was mulched nicely. In addition a number of little knick-knacks decorate the shed. The shed is simple and modern yet tastefully done. IDEA: Buy a simple shed shell and decorate it exotically with flowers, mulching, and more.
Shed foundations fall into two basic categories: on-grade and frost-proof. On-grade foundations (sometimes called “floating foundations” — that’s this kind, not this kind) sit right on the ground and are sufficient for all but the very largest outbuildings. They’re also the quickest and simplest to build because they don’t require you to dig deep holes or pour concrete footings or piers. On-grade foundations are usually made of pressure-treated lumber or solid-concrete blocks.
Test-fit the pattern rafter and adjust its notches. When it fits accurately all along the beams, use it to mark and cut the remaining rafters. First, cut all the rafters to length. Then clamp together all the rafter stock, including the pattern rafter, edge up. Mark and cut all of the notches to match the pattern rafter. Use a chisel to finish each notch.
Cut the treated 6x6s to 12 ft. and set them on the gravel so they’re parallel and the outside edges are 6 ft. apart. On sloped ground, you’ll have to raise the 6×6 on the low side until it’s level with the adjacent 6×6. Do this by stacking treated 2x6s, 4x6s or 6x6s on top of the treated 6×6 to reach the right height. Use a 4-ft. or longer level to make sure the 6x6s are level and level with each other. Finally, square the 6x6s by adjusting the position of one 6×6. Slide the 6×6 back and forth, not sideways, until the diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Build the platform with treated 2x6s, 24 in. on center, and cover it with treated 3/4-in. plywood (Figure B).

Arch-top windows and a custom door give this shed a high-quality look that belies its low cost and simple construction. The panelized construction technique means you could build the parts in your garage on a rainy weekend and then haul them to the site for assembly. Modest finishes like OSB siding and composite trim and fiberglass shingles help keep the materials cost low. And you’ll save hundreds of dollars by providing your own labor to build the door and windows. The modular construction and wood platform foundation mean you can construct this shed almost anywhere, even on remote or sloping sites. In this article, we’ll show you the basics of how to build the shed and install the windows and doors.


Start by setting deck blocks on the ground, positioned as shown in the plans. While the area doesn’t have to be perfectly level, you should make the ground roughly level where each block will rest. Temporarily place some straight 2-by-6 lumber on edge in the top grooves of the blocks to orient the blocks in a straight line. Arrange two rows of four blocks parallel to each other to form both long walls, then measure diagonally across the outside corners to determine how square the arrangement is. If the two long walls are parallel, and diagonal measurements taken across corners are equal, then each corner is guaranteed to be 90 degrees. Finish up by placing one deck block in the middle of each 6-foot wall after you have aligned and squared the 8-foot walls.
After nailing the walls together at the corners, install temporary diagonal braces on the inside to hold the walls plumb (Photo above).  Make sure the walls are firmly nailed together at the corners. Then use a level to plumb the corners while you attach temporary diagonal bracing to the inside of the walls. Brace all four walls. You can remove the bracing after you install the siding panels.
Use dimensions from Figure C (in Additional Information below) to snap lines for the peak. Then cut 2x4s to fit inside the lines and toe-screw them to the plywood to hold them in place while you fill in the center studs (Photo 1) and nail on the siding (Photo 2). Toe-screw from the outside so the screws will be accessible after the siding is installed.
The front and back gable ends are covered with panels that resemble cedar shakes. After installing a metal drip cap over the 1×2 that caps the wide trim board, install the shakes according to the manufacturer’s instructions (Photo above). Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for details about panel placement and how much caulk space to leave between the panels and the trim.
Beauty is powerful. Even in an aged setting or with old material, beauty can still ooze out. In fact sometimes the agedness enhances the beauty. This is especially true with this old shed. While its waterwheel idea and the old wood may go back years, its beauty is still worth crediting. Some of the old things in life make great garden shed ideas. IDEA: Create a garden environment with old things such as a waterwheel.

A garden shed can be strictly functional, but it can also be a decorative focal point around which you design your garden or yard. These plans will help you build a basic shed, but don’t stop there! To customize your shed, you could create a combination toolshed and greenhouse, put a martin house on top, or use part of the shed for a chicken coop or rabbit hutch. If you’re feeling even more adventurous, you could create a living roof of moss or succulent plants.
I’ve always wanted to learn more about woodworking. Learn framing. Be better at picturing the insides of the walls I’m always messing with. Overall, I want to also increase my knowledge on the kinds of tools I don’t really use as much for interior DIYs (like a roofing nailer?!?! BRING IT ON!). I learned a little by volunteering in Habitat for Humanity events, but I know that there is still so much more fun stuff I could be doing and learning. So, after months of trying to think of where best to put it, what it might look like, the hoops I might have to jump through to get it, I’m going for it! I am building it from scratch (not using a shed-building kit), and I will share as I go, warts and all (and I’m sure, a few mistakes). 😃 😃 😃
Well, not these plans. You have the option of building a very functional and spacious lean-to shed on different foundations. Your foundation choices are: concrete slab, a wooden floor supported by concrete piers, or a wooden floor supported by skids. That lost option also means that your lean-to could be mobile as well so you won’t have to decide where you want to permanently put it.
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