For me, heating with firewood is more about feeling self-sufficient than it is about lowering my utility bills. I also like cutting and splitting logs. It's good exercise and the source of my wife's wry nickname for me, the Saturday Lumberjack. But storing and keeping the wood dry is a hassle. Tarps can trap moisture, promote rot, and be difficult to remove after a snowfall. And stacking the wood inside is a poor choice, unless you enjoy the company of insects and mice.

The roof truss can be built using 2x4 or 2x6 lumbers. There are different ways to build the truss, the most common is cutting out the rafters and assembling them using gussets. The easiest way to build the roof truss will be using plans. The other option will be to lay the 2x4’s or 2x6’s on the level floor set them how you want your roof and make a template. Once you are happy with the look of your template you can build the rest.


Ok, now this shed absolutely looks like a tiny house! Everything about it is so adorable! This one even comes complete with quaint little flower boxes at the windows! Talk about charm and being functional! This shed brings the best of both worlds. This shed almost looks like a tiny colonial home all the way down to the tiny wreaths at the front of the door and the tiny chimney up at the top.
Ambitious recyclers build sheds from existing materials, like doors, reclaimed lumber, windows, and the ever-popular crates. If you are on a tight budget but really want a shed, research the DIY projects featured on social media, in books, and home and garden websites like The Spruce. Whatever you decide, try to follow through with the project. You don't need the added stress of a half-finished shed every time you walk out your back door.
It’s often necessary to stack two or more solid-concrete blocks on top of one another to create a level foundation. To keep the blocks from sliding out of position as you set the floor frame in place, use a caulking gun to apply a generous bead of construction adhesive between the blocks. You can also use the adhesive to glue shims to the tops of the blocks.
Concrete requires 3” (7.5 cm) of compacted hardcore (all-in ballast or other crushed rubble/gravel) underneath the 3″ concrete layer. The base can be level with the ground or raised above it. If you want it to be level, excavate the top earth to 6” (15 cm), to allow for the hardcore layer and 3” (7.5 cm) of concrete. Level the area with a rake and spade and remove the pegs.

*Please note the content in this blog post is intended only to provide a summary and general overview on building a pallet bar. It is not intended to be comprehensive. You should refer to the instruction and safety manual of tools and paints you use and seek professional advice if unsure of how to execute the tasks before acting or relying on any of the instructions.
It is crucial to provide a level and dry foundation for garden sheds. Never assemble a shed on an unsound base otherwise, you run the risk that screw holes connecting the wall panels will not line up. For larger buildings, especially if you’re going to use the shed as a workshop, a full concrete base is your best option. However, there are three main popular types of shed base;
Since this is going to be a much bigger project, it will be isolated as its own series (look for “Pub Shed” as the category on posts for updates). As you guys might have seen in some of my Instagram shares or updates about the back yard, I’ve already begun the process to try to make it into a reality. More specific details (now that I’ve actually announced the first round of plans with this post) will be upcoming, including building the base (it’s not fully “in” yet, so that will have its own post when it is).
A garden shed can be strictly functional, but it can also be a decorative focal point around which you design your garden or yard. These plans will help you build a basic shed, but don’t stop there! To customize your shed, you could create a combination toolshed and greenhouse, put a martin house on top, or use part of the shed for a chicken coop or rabbit hutch. If you’re feeling even more adventurous, you could create a living roof of moss or succulent plants.
For example, the last three sheds I built were trimmed with white PVC trim boards instead of painted cedar 1 x 4s. This new plastic lumber, which I used for the rake, fascia, frieze and corner boards, is impervious to bugs, warping, splitting or decay, and it never needs painting. Other low-maintenance options include: vinyl or aluminum windows, faux-slate roof shingles, fiberglass or steel doors, composite decking for steps, and fiber-cement siding. (I don't usually recommend aluminum or vinyl siding for sheds; neither material is rugged enough to survive the inevitable beating outbuildings take.)
Next, you will need to insert wooden shuttering or formwork around the edges of your excavated area. This will need to be made from 6"x1" timber and screwed or nailed into position. If need be, wooden pegged to form a square, level solid formwork to hold back the hardcore and concrete (in the next step). The reason for the original excavation to be 2" bigger all the way around is to take into consideration the wooden frame, you will now have an internal area of 8"x6". If you decide to use thicker timber you will need to take this into consideration at the stringing out stage. 
At first glance, this shed looks life an old craft spot or an antique area. Admittedly it does have a bunch of rustic decoration and wood siding which is less flashy and classy than vinyl would be. However this shed is rather new and of recent design. It a combination of the past and the present. IDEA: Create a reminiscent spot with a new shed with old decoration.
We built inexpensive windows for the shed using plastic barn sash mounted in 1×4 pine frames (Photo above and Figure Q and R). Start by measuring the sash and building a 1×4 frame that’s 1/4 in. wider and taller than the sash. Cut 10-degree angles on the bottom of the sides to provide a sloping sill. Cut 1×2 stops to fit in the frame and position them to hold the sash flush with the outside edge of the 1×4 frame. Then attach galvanized screen door hinges to the frame, set the sash in place and drill holes for the fasteners. Since the plastic isn’t strong enough to hold wood screws, we drilled holes through the sash and attached the hinges with machine screws, washers and nuts.
Cut the treated 6x6s to 12 ft. and set them on the gravel so they’re parallel and the outside edges are 6 ft. apart. On sloped ground, you’ll have to raise the 6×6 on the low side until it’s level with the adjacent 6×6. Do this by stacking treated 2x6s, 4x6s or 6x6s on top of the treated 6×6 to reach the right height. Use a 4-ft. or longer level to make sure the 6x6s are level and level with each other. Finally, square the 6x6s by adjusting the position of one 6×6. Slide the 6×6 back and forth, not sideways, until the diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Build the platform with treated 2x6s, 24 in. on center, and cover it with treated 3/4-in. plywood (Figure B).
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