This is nothing flashy or classy. Its paint is peeling, its roof is rusting, and its luster is gone. It looks drab to the eye looking for the latest and the greatest. However there remains some beauty. It may be hidden to the modern eye, but it is still there. It speaks of the glories of time past. It has the revered gothic style windows with their inspiring, curved and pointed arch. The roof has a delightfully rustic look that speaks of something that has been around for a long time and deserves to be cherished. The paint may be old and peeling but it is not meaningless. Rustic garden sheds may be old but they speak of having weathered many storms. This is aged beauty that will not disappear right away. So for the first IDEA: Reuse and enjoy oldness rather than getting rid of it.

If you have a router, use a hinge-mortising bit (or straight bit) to cut the hinge recesses (Photo 10). Otherwise, use a sharp chisel. Screw the hinges to the door and trim. To hang the door, line up a temporary 2×4 with the bottom of the siding and screw it to the wall. Then rest the door on the 2×4 and drive 3-in. screws through the trim into the framing to hold the door in place (Photo 11). Finish the door installation by adding the top and side trim pieces.
This shed studio is the perfect place for relaxing, getting some work done, or even living in! Tiny homes are all the rage these days, and what better way to construct a tiny home than utilizing a refurbished garden shed. Not only is the space so cost-effective, but it can really be a great little space if you know how to work with the area well. It could turn out to be a fun project!
This worked awesome. Build a 8x12ft greenhouse using these brackets. Be careful, the brackets are as sharp as a razor and will cut very easily, but it worked really well. Buy two, and 12ft 2x4s and 8fter's work great. Buy a deadblow hammer cause it takes a little persuasion since wood is never perfectly straight, but once you get the gist of it, you're on your way.
I’m looking at putting a 10 x 12 shed in our back yard (Michigan). I’m wondering what would be recommended – if anything – for a base. It looks like, from the installation process photos, that the builder will assemble the foundation and can put that directly onto the grass. Our ground is level enough – within the 6″ required – so I don’t think that would be an issue. It sounds like – from what i am reading – that I wouldn’t NEED to do anything to prepare in terms of putting down stone or anything. Is that correct?
I’ve looked into it, and reviewed the rules for what my county requires and also called the county’s code office to ask them questions. The main issue is whether or not the structure is considered “permanent” or not. I’ll get into that in more detail on a future post but you’re ABSOLUTELY RIGHT about checking to make sure you have everything you need before you start!
You’ll need standard DIY tools including a circular saw and drill to build this pub shed. A framing nail gun and compressor will speed up the framing. Since there’s a lot of trim and siding to nail up, we used a coil siding nailer loaded with galvanized ring-shank siding nails. You can rent a coil siding nail gun like this for about $30 a day. A miter saw and table saw aren’t required but will make your cuts more accurate. This is a big pub shed, but it’s no more complicated than a small one. If you have experience with deck building or other small carpentry projects, you shouldn’t have any trouble finishing this pub shed. There are a lot of materials to cut and hoist, though, so you’ll want to round up a few helpers. Expect to spend five or six weekends completing the pub shed.
I even have a friend whose parents have a bar shed. They don’t call it that, and I never realized it until writing this article, but it’s the size, shape, and build of a standard shed, located near their pool. It houses all of the pool supplies, alongside a nice 4-person bar, a beer fridge, and a sizable selection of liquor. It was right in front of my eyes all this time. I just never really thought of it as a bar shed.
the biggest problem I had was that the instructions I downloaded from the manufactures web site had a different cut list than the documents that came with the kits. I had already cut the lumber based on the downloaded list so I was dismayed to find that two of the lengths specified in the packaging were longer than the ones I cut from the downloaded plans. I did try assembling an arch with both specs, but nether of the lengths resulted in an arch that actually matched the frame. I wound up forcing things to fit and got the framing up, but it was much harder than it looked and you need at least three people to put it all together.
You can build the walls on any flat surface, but the shed platform is ideal. Snap chalk lines on the plywood deck, 3-1/2 in. from the edges of the platform, to indicate the inside edge of the walls. Measure to make sure the lines are parallel and 89 in. apart. Then chalk a line down the center (Photo 1). You’ll use this line to make sure the angled top plates meet in the center.
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