Even though garden sheds are typically one-story structures, there’s no rule that says you can’t change that. Take this shed for example. It’s a two-level structure and the second story is a quiet and relaxing area, like a mini-bedroom. In this case, both the interior and exterior designs are elegant. The shed is infused with natural sunlight coming through the dormer window upstairs and the checkerboard tile floor adds a touch of style as well.
For this reason, I am planning to run utilities to the building including natural gas, water, sewer, etc. in order to locate the sewer line for proper flow (connection location) I was hoping to have a standard footer with crawl space installed and attached the building on top of it (just like a house). This way I could access the utilities by removing sections of the floor so I could run the sewer line (and other utilities) to exact areas of the building. Is it possible to have the building constructed/attached on top of this type of footer system?

In a Vero Beach, Florida, midcentury modern neighborhood, Sanders Pace Architecture retained the lines and essence of the original house while redesigning it for their client's 21st-century lifestyle. Although it's at the front of the house and initially might resemble a garage, the detached "shed" can be used as a private studio or for guests. Because it's located on the coast, hurricane-proof doors were needed, but cedar was installed over them for an attractive but sturdy structure.
This garden shed takes its name very seriously. It’s placed in the middle of the garden and stands out with its cute white design. It’s a lovely addition to the landscape and it’s very functional as well. It’s great for storing all the garden tools and it also serves as a comfortable work space and a lovely area for relaxation and for entertaining friends.
In each corner place an L-shaped plate against the inside of the long capping timber close to the spike you’ve just attached: one side against the wood, the other on the ground. Hammer the plate to flatten it against the ground until the top is flush with the timber. Screw the plate to the frame, and repeat for each corner. These L-plates help to keep your shed level.

This side shed is a great way to store simple stuff, such as the lawn mower or your garden tools. It almost blends into the scene with the toy beside it and the rich foliage next to it. It is unobtrusive but quite functional, as it will prevent so many tools from either rusting in the rain or being baked in the sun. Overall, these sheds can save you money since all of your garden essentials will be protected.
It is very critical to have a dry and level foundation. It is impractical to build a shed on an uneven foundation. This will prevent the wall sections (simple diagrams for making shed from scratch) from fitting into place when you try to secure them to each other. For sheds which will need to hold heavy items, it is recommended to build a concrete foundation. The two most common methods of building the shed foundation are as follows.
Turn any outdoor shed space into a space fit for a booming garden party with festive lights, such as these decorative garden lights. The bulbs hang elegantly above the heads of your guests during your next cocktail party, lighting up space and conversation with their calming glow. These string lights do not have to be so expensive, as there are so many brands and designs to choose from.
Beauty is powerful. Even in an aged setting or with old material, beauty can still ooze out. In fact sometimes the agedness enhances the beauty. This is especially true with this old shed. While its waterwheel idea and the old wood may go back years, its beauty is still worth crediting. Some of the old things in life make great garden shed ideas. IDEA: Create a garden environment with old things such as a waterwheel.
You can make shelves using blocks that are left over when you dismantle the pallets and you could use left over pallet wood or ply wood.  I used some old decking off cuts. Drill two blocks on to the wall – good to use a spirit level to get these straight, then lay the pallet wood/ply wood/decking cut to size on top and screw the shelf onto the blocks.

I'm always surprised at how little forethought most backyard builders give to the shed's doors. After all, there's no sense in building a shed to store a particular item, such as a lawn tractor or wheelbarrow, if you can't fit it through the door. I saw a shed recently that had its doors removed. When I asked why, the homeowner explained that he framed the doorway wide enough for his riding lawnmower, but didn't take into account the amount of space taken up by the hinged inset doors. So, he had to remove the doors to fit the mower inside. (He's in the market for a skinnier mower.)
This backyard shed doubles as a romantic farmhouse. Unlike a typical farmhouse, this shed oozes all things romantic, from the cut out hearts to the rustic feel. It would be hard not to fall in love with this cozy little shack, as it is adorable to admire and probably even more fun to be in. This would make the perfect, quaint addition to an outdoor garden party area.
It's obvious that the designer who created simple shed designs like this one wanted to create an outdoor place to relax out of the sun and weather. The simple 2×4 framing and plywood sheathing add an interesting and low-cost touch. But, it’s the owner's use of a pair of sliding glass doors that make this shed so special. Here again, you could save money by sourcing many of the materials such as the doors from a local salvage dealer.

This side shed is a great way to store simple stuff, such as the lawn mower or your garden tools. It almost blends into the scene with the toy beside it and the rich foliage next to it. It is unobtrusive but quite functional, as it will prevent so many tools from either rusting in the rain or being baked in the sun. Overall, these sheds can save you money since all of your garden essentials will be protected.
Next, frame the floor with 2x6s. Start by cutting the 12-ft.-long rim joists for the front and back and marking the joist locations. Cut the joists and nail them to the rim joists. When you’re done, square the joists (Photo above). Then use a taut string line or sight down the 12-ft. rim joist to make sure it’s straight. Then drive toenails through the joists into the 6x6s to hold the joists in place.

The construction of a wood foundation is usually built using pressure-treated 2x6 lumbers. These parts are called the band on the ends and the joist in the middle of the band, spaced out 16-24 inches apart. The foundation frame will sit on top of pressure-treated 4x4 posts called skids. The skids will set on the cinder blocks or on top of gravel to prevent rot.
Once the concrete has cured, set a post on top of the footer. Use the intersection of the mason's string to set the post square. Making sure the post is plumb — and holding it straight — add concrete around the sides and cover with soil. Brace each post to keep it in position while the concrete sets. Watch our video How Do I Set a Post in Concrete? for an illustration of bracing.
This year’s pub shed is one of the most versatile we’ve ever built. The bar and covered patio area make it a perfect place to entertain or just hang out. The steep roof and sturdy lofts provide tons of extra storage space. And the high-tech materials, including reflective roof sheathing and prefinished floor panels, add to the shed’s comfort and convenience. Of course, if you don’t want a bar, you can install a bank of windows in its place. In fact, without too much more work, you could eliminate the front porch and build one big shed for even more storage space

This waterfront shed looks like a miniature version of a rustic lodge. The scene itself is something out of a camping or hiking magazine. The serene sky in the background just encompasses this adorable shed set right next to this impressive water element. The wooden doors accent the stone makeup of the shed and the fence in the back only complements all these elements together. A gorgeous scene, for sure!

Thank you for visiting our blog. Asphalt has no values worthy of anchoring a structure to since upheave on it can occur easily. I understand you are not anchoring to it but asphalt can get soft in extreme heat. Asphalt may compress unlike gravel, which once leveled, should remain solid for a shed foundation. Suggest you stay with proven fill under foundations such as a gravel intended for this use. Your local gravel supplier can recommend the size. I hope this helps answer your questions. Feel free to give us a call at 855.853.8558 if you have any other questions. Have a great day!


Dig trenches about 12 in. wide and about 10 in. below where you want the bottom edge of the joists to end up. Pour 4 in. of gravel into the trenches and level it off. Make sure the gravel in all three trenches is at the same height. Then cut the 6x6s to 12 ft. long and set them in the trenches. Measure to make sure  the 6x6s are parallel. Then measure diagonally from the ends of the outside 6x6s to make certain they’re square. The diagonal measurements should be equal. Finally, level the 6x6s (Photo above and Figure B in project pdfs).
Although skids are often set directly on the ground, I prefer to lay them on a bed of gravel. The stone creates a very stable base that’s not likely to settle or wash away. Begin by laying the skids in position on the ground, then mark around each one using spray paint or flour sprinkled from a can. Move the skids out of the way, then use a flat shovel to remove the sod and about 2 in. of soil from the marked areas. Check the excavated areas to make sure they’re close to being level. If they’re not, remove a little more soil from the high spots. Next, add 3 in. to 4 in. of gravel. Compact the gravel with a hand tamper or gas-powered plate compactor, then replace the skids.
The front and back gable ends are covered with panels that resemble cedar shakes. After installing a metal drip cap over the 1×2 that caps the wide trim board, install the shakes according to the manufacturer’s instructions (Photo above). Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for details about panel placement and how much caulk space to leave between the panels and the trim.
If you have a router, use a hinge-mortising bit (or straight bit) to cut the hinge recesses (Photo 10). Otherwise, use a sharp chisel. Screw the hinges to the door and trim. To hang the door, line up a temporary 2×4 with the bottom of the siding and screw it to the wall. Then rest the door on the 2×4 and drive 3-in. screws through the trim into the framing to hold the door in place (Photo 11). Finish the door installation by adding the top and side trim pieces.
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