Most homeowners barely have enough time to keep their homes in shape, never mind their sheds. Heck, I was supposed to paint our downstairs bathroom before the kids got out of school last month. I just picked up the paint yesterday. That's why it's smart to choose low-maintenance materials for your shed. You usually need to pay a bit extra for these, but they'll save you time and trouble in the long run.
This is another example of surroundings that fit with the garden shed. Actually, it would be more accurate to say that the shed blends and fits with its surroundings. The dark colors blend with the woody area and the darker mulch. The green trim has enough of green to connect at least somewhat with the greenery around it. IDEA # 27: Make your shed blend with nature instead of change the natural setting to fit your shed.
Have a particularly small outdoor garden area yet want to safely secure tools? Not a problem! Garden sheds and virtually come in all shapes and sizes. Deepening on the size of your particular garden, you may just need a smaller space to store important stuff in. In this garden shed idea, space is small enough to be intrusive into a yard space but effective enough to get the storage job done.
We recently removed our 12 x 10 shed due to opossums living underneath and mice making visits. We are looking at a 6 x 5 resin shed and we want it to be stable and eliminate any unwanted guests! Our plan is to have a concrete pad poured and we heard the pad should be the same size as the shed to keep water from gathering around the shed. Are we on the right track or do you have other ideas? Thanks!
There are two 4×4 posts at the front of the shed that support the front half of the roof. Secure the bottom of the posts to the deck frame with metal post anchors. Tie the top of the posts together with the second (top) 2×4 plates that run over the top of the walls. Miter the ends of the 2×4 plates over the posts and attach them with screws (Photo above).
For me, heating with firewood is more about feeling self-sufficient than it is about lowering my utility bills. I also like cutting and splitting logs. It's good exercise and the source of my wife's wry nickname for me, the Saturday Lumberjack. But storing and keeping the wood dry is a hassle. Tarps can trap moisture, promote rot, and be difficult to remove after a snowfall. And stacking the wood inside is a poor choice, unless you enjoy the company of insects and mice.
You can make shelves using blocks that are left over when you dismantle the pallets and you could use left over pallet wood or ply wood.  I used some old decking off cuts. Drill two blocks on to the wall – good to use a spirit level to get these straight, then lay the pallet wood/ply wood/decking cut to size on top and screw the shelf onto the blocks.
When installing a wooden garden shed you must ensure that you have an even and level surface onto which you can build it. This can be created using either a premade wooden shed base, a plastic shed base, solid concrete, garden slabs or even timber decking. Failing to prepare a level surface will lead to your shed warping, which can result in damaged timber or even broken windows. If you're using one of our shed bases you will still need to clear the area for rubble. It's also a good idea to lay a weed/damp proof membranes, to prevent growth and eventual damage to your shed.
 If you do not require a shed floor it would be advisable at this stage to add a damp proof membrane, this can be laid on top of the hardcore ready for the concrete. A concrete mix of 5 parts ballast and 1 part cement should now be mixed and poured into the area, enough concrete should be poured so that it is just proud of the formwork. It can now be tampered down level and flat using a straight piece of solid timber. The result should be a smooth level concrete base - the ultimate shed base.
Set up a levelled formwork. This involves measuring, cutting and fitting timber to the shape of the base in order to contain the concrete. Check diagonal measurements to ensure the formwork is square and level as this will determine whether your shed base is 100% sturdy. Next, spread a layer ofwell-compactedd hardcore (all-in ballast or crushed gravel) and cover with a liberal amount of sand. This needs be well compacted and flattened down, preferably with a compacting tool or roller.
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Wood foundations are typically built using solid concrete leveling blocks which are 8” x 16” and no more than 2” high. Each block is arranged in evenly spaced rows by placing one in each corner and at each break. These concrete leveling blocks will support the floor. If you choose not to use concrete leveling blocks, we recommend using pressure treated lumber to support the wooden floor frame.

Victoria, Australia-based Archiblox designs and makes sustainable, prefabricated modular residential and commercial projects. This simple, straightforward, and modern structure can be used as a studio, office, guest house, or pretty much whatever you desire. Modules can be grouped together for larger spaces and are designed to subtly echo the geometrical arrangement seen in nature.
We’ve also recognized that one shed design does not fit all. Our innovative modular system allows for tremendous customization to fit your exact needs. We offer millions of combinations of sizes, door and window placements, and colors and options. All of these have been thoughtfully designed to work together, and engineered properly to create spaces that function in a variety of climates and conditions. Our 3D Configurator allows you to design and price a building that meets both your needs and your budget without having to wait for architectural renderings, or pay the cost associated with design-build.
You should then lay approximately 3” (75mm) of concrete. Concrete can be produced using either bags of dry mixed concrete with small amounts of water added at a time, or making a mixture of ‘all-in’ ballast, cement and water. For this second alternative, it is mixed in the ratio of 1 part of cement for 5 parts ‘all-in’ ballast. ‘All-in’ ballast is sold in 40kg bags at most building merchants or DIY stores (Note approx 1.25 will be required to produce around 1 cubic foot of concrete). Do not allow the mix to become too wet as this will weaken the concrete.

This wooden shed may be simple, but it is within the simplicity of the structure that the true beauty is a draw. This would make the perfect playhouse for children or even a getaway space to go have some coffee in and read a book in. It is an adorable space that could be used for so many different things. The possibilities are endless when it comes to shedding like these.
This is an adorable way to incorporate a garden shed into your backyard space while maintaining that rustic charm. Utilizing a log cabin garden shed is not only purposeful, but it is super cute, too. The shed can be used to store all of your garden tools and essentials, but looks so cute on its own; it could absolutely act as a standalone, as well. The natural wood color of this shed also adds to that rustic charm.
Spread the concrete evenly in the shuttering, taking particular care to push the concrete into the corners and edges. Arguably the best method to lay the concrete is to do it a layer at a time and compact it until the shuttering frame is full. Leave the concrete flush with the top of the framework and smooth it out using either a wooden or plastic float.
You’ll need standard DIY tools including a circular saw and drill to build this pub shed. A framing nail gun and compressor will speed up the framing. Since there’s a lot of trim and siding to nail up, we used a coil siding nailer loaded with galvanized ring-shank siding nails. You can rent a coil siding nail gun like this for about $30 a day. A miter saw and table saw aren’t required but will make your cuts more accurate. This is a big pub shed, but it’s no more complicated than a small one. If you have experience with deck building or other small carpentry projects, you shouldn’t have any trouble finishing this pub shed. There are a lot of materials to cut and hoist, though, so you’ll want to round up a few helpers. Expect to spend five or six weekends completing the pub shed.

Without the correct base erecting a shed can prove very tricky. It is extremely important that all garden buildings are constructed on a firm and level base which is constructed from the correct, durable material. Assembling the base incorrectly can lead to future deterioration of the product such as doors dropping out of square, thus becoming complicated to use or causing a water leakage.


Cut the sill piece and assemble the windows with pocket screws. Using a router with a 3/8-in. rabbet bit, rout a 3/8-in.-deep recess on the back of the window to receive the 1/4-in. Plexiglas acrylic sheet (Photo 14). Set the window frame, recessed side down, over a piece of acrylic sheet and trace the shape with a permanent marker. Cut the curve with a fine-tooth jigsaw blade and the straight sections with a fine-tooth blade in a table saw or circular saw.
Flowers are always a good idea when it comes to creating a tiny shed space. No matter what you are turning your shed into, you should be sure to decorate the landscape around it appropriately. Going for a rustic, desert theme? Succulents and cacti are your go-to. Prefer an English garden space? Gorgeous multi-colored flowers and tiny table set up for tea would be perfect.
Search the hashtage #vintagetrailers on Instagram and you'll discover some 80,000 images of big, small, and mid-sized aluminum travel trailers from roughly the 1950s to 1970s. You might find gleaming silver Airstreams at a lodging rental in Joshua Tree or parked temporarily at a campground near Yellowstone. One trend that hasn't lost steam is the backyard she-shed trailer escape, a dolled-up adult playhouse where women--or men--can escape for alone time or to hang out with friends and a bottle or two of wine.  There's even a Vintage Trailer Magazine for enthusiasts. This vintage Aljo trailer rests in the backyard of a house in Pasadena, California.

Recently there has been a push toward tiny homes. This cool shed is a great example of that. Is it small yet very classy. It simple single slant roof is one of the common features. Plus it has a very clean and minimalistic look. There is not much extra decoration on this one. IDEA: Build a tiny home in your backyard garden and use it as living quarters.

You should then lay approximately 3” (75mm) of concrete. Concrete can be produced using either bags of dry mixed concrete with small amounts of water added at a time, or making a mixture of ‘all-in’ ballast, cement and water. For this second alternative, it is mixed in the ratio of 1 part of cement for 5 parts ‘all-in’ ballast. ‘All-in’ ballast is sold in 40kg bags at most building merchants or DIY stores (Note approx 1.25 will be required to produce around 1 cubic foot of concrete). Do not allow the mix to become too wet as this will weaken the concrete.
This country garden shed not only offers a covered space to pretty much do whatever you’d like with, but it adds so much character to the scene. You can easily set up chairs and table to create an adorable place to sit and have your morning coffee while reading the paper. It is a conversation piece and even a conversation space if you were to utilize it that way.

This waterfront shed looks like a miniature version of a rustic lodge. The scene itself is something out of a camping or hiking magazine. The serene sky in the background just encompasses this adorable shed set right next to this impressive water element. The wooden doors accent the stone makeup of the shed and the fence in the back only complements all these elements together. A gorgeous scene, for sure!

The roof truss can be built using 2x4 or 2x6 lumbers. There are different ways to build the truss, the most common is cutting out the rafters and assembling them using gussets. The easiest way to build the roof truss will be using plans. The other option will be to lay the 2x4’s or 2x6’s on the level floor set them how you want your roof and make a template. Once you are happy with the look of your template you can build the rest.
This is one of the bigger (and more costly) DIYs I’ve ever wanted to do, so I’m going to have some first-time learning curves ahead. Also, obviously, it’s something I’ve had to save up for. If you’ve noticed the increase in my sponsored projects on the site over the last few months, this is one of the main reasons I’ve taken them on (the summer is usually when I wind up working with more sponsors, so I wanted to funnel some of that to immediately start planning for this!). I’ve already seen what the kinds of costs are to have one custom built by ordering, so I’m hoping the DIY is also going to be more budget-friendly.
This wood storage shed is a great element to the backyard setting since its super cute and definitely nifty. Store all your garden tools and even power tools in this shed since its large enough. It even has an adorable covered patio area where you and keep all your chopped wood. It is a good place to keep the wood dry for any upcoming fire pits or barbecues when the weather starts to get warm.
Figure G (in Additional Information below) shows details for the marking jig. Photo 12 shows how to use this setup to draw the curves for the window pieces. Next cut the side pieces (Figure F, in Additional Information below). Set the side pieces in place over the top of the header and mark the angled cuts (Photo 13). Finish the curved trim piece by first cutting the angles on each end, and then sawing the curves with a jigsaw and sanding them smooth. Use the marking jig to lay out the curved brace, too (Figure G, in Additional Information below).
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