Have a particularly small outdoor garden area yet want to safely secure tools? Not a problem! Garden sheds and virtually come in all shapes and sizes. Deepening on the size of your particular garden, you may just need a smaller space to store important stuff in. In this garden shed idea, space is small enough to be intrusive into a yard space but effective enough to get the storage job done.
When thinking about how to make a shed look nice, take a cue from the shed’s surroundings. Set among towering trees and winding stone paths, weathered wood and traditional cottage design elements befit this shed’s forest setting. The steely blue-gray door and shutters suit the design and a glazed finish gives the features a bit of dimension. Board and batten siding offers distinction to the simple form of the garden shed.
It is easy to transform a garden shed into a stylish office space with so many design ideas out there. There are plenty of design platforms to help get you going, but when it comes down to it; your space should be uniquely you. Whether you prefer a more luxurious space or just need a space to gather your thoughts, your office shed should be a place you feel comfortable in.
For a seating area I cut 4 x 18 inch lengths of 3x3 post and I had some 12mm thick wood that I used for the seat but you could use ply board (I recommend 18mm for strength). Simply cut the ply to size then drive a screw through the ply board into the posts. Once made then use corner braces to secure in place to add that extra strength and make sure you test it out before you use it. If you are making a longer seating area then you may need more posts in the middle for support.
Remember small amounts of water should be added at a time, and mixed into the concrete. Be careful as excessive amounts may make the cement too sloppy and it needs to stay reasonably dry. Spread the concrete evenly and slightly above the formwork. This can be then levelled off with a long straight edge of timber resting on the formwork. Use a sawing motion slowly over the entire surface of the freshly laid concrete.
The plans showed up stapled together, with floor plans, an isometric drawing, and then half of the instructions are for the concrete pad/anchors, with alternative designs for people in wetter locales. Finally there are some pages of general materials advice. It's really a great deal, when some garage plans are 200 bucks. Those, I believe, are a bit more detailed, but then this structure is not meant to be a crazy engineering undertaking. The plans are worth the 30 dollars.
If wet weather is forecast, cover the concrete with polythene for 24-hours. In warm weather, cover the base with damp sacks and sprinkle them with water over the 24-hour period, this will ensure the drying concrete will not shrink and crack. The result will be a smooth, sound and level base. The perfect foundation for the construction of a garden shed.
You can use the backyard garden shed as a space for housing your lawnmower, planting supplies, pots, seeds, old furnishings, etc. On the other hand, you could even install a backyard garden shed as a tiny house the kids can play in. However, you choose to use your backyard garden shed, there are plenty of ways to incorporate the space into your garden scene! Here are some of the best ideas on how to use a backyard garden shed in your own garden.

Do not purchase materials or attempt to build this shed project unless you have studied the information provided thoroughly, and have verified all dimensions and material requirements for yourself. Also verify that the plans conform to local building codes and practices. Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information and design, the user is ultimately responsible for the use of this information. All information provided is copyrighted and cannot be duplicated without the permission of Shedking. 


Clear plexiglass has been used extensively throughout this shed to provide the level of natural lighting needed to create a private reading shed. Plexiglass is extremely durable and makes the perfect choice for this particular use. Not only does it let in plenty of light, but it will keep out the odd wayward softball. Although plexiglass can be a little on the expensive side, you should find the investment more than worthwhile when you see how long it lasts.


Why buy a greenhouse if you can make it yourself? Especially if it is much cheaper? A cool shed like this can be done very cheaply. The main materials needed are old replacement windows, an old door, a few pieces of wood for rafters, and some polycarbonate roofing sheets. IDEA: Rather than throwing away your old windows, door, and other materials, turn them into a greenhouse shed.
It's important to accurately place the footings, or piers—it makes the build quicker and easier by preventing constant remeasuring and adjustment. We set the four corner piers in rough position and brought them into alignment with a string line. Then we used a tape measure to check the diagonals of this rectangle and to position the fifth and sixth piers relative to the perimeter.

How about scouring the river for a few days to gather wood for a shed? That may sound like a ridiculous and like one of those cool shed ideas. However, it is cheap, out-of-the-box, and likely a possibility for a unique and very rustic garden centerpiece. It may not be classy but why does it need to be. It is definitely an idea with potential for a different kind of beauty. IDEA: Gather some driftwood and turn it into a rustically beautiful garden shed


When thinking about how to make a shed look nice, take a cue from the shed’s surroundings. Set among towering trees and winding stone paths, weathered wood and traditional cottage design elements befit this shed’s forest setting. The steely blue-gray door and shutters suit the design and a glazed finish gives the features a bit of dimension. Board and batten siding offers distinction to the simple form of the garden shed.
It is crucial to provide a level and dry foundation for garden sheds. Never assemble a shed on an unsound base otherwise, you run the risk that screw holes connecting the wall panels will not line up. For larger buildings, especially if you’re going to use the shed as a workshop, a full concrete base is your best option. However, there are three main popular types of shed base;
We built inexpensive windows for the shed using plastic barn sash mounted in 1×4 pine frames (Photo above and Figure Q and R). Start by measuring the sash and building a 1×4 frame that’s 1/4 in. wider and taller than the sash. Cut 10-degree angles on the bottom of the sides to provide a sloping sill. Cut 1×2 stops to fit in the frame and position them to hold the sash flush with the outside edge of the 1×4 frame. Then attach galvanized screen door hinges to the frame, set the sash in place and drill holes for the fasteners. Since the plastic isn’t strong enough to hold wood screws, we drilled holes through the sash and attached the hinges with machine screws, washers and nuts.
This small backyard shed is a minimalist approach to a larger storage facility. Its classic design serves both in function and as a great element to have in a backyard setting. The shed looks sleek, modern and interesting. It does not look like a standard storage shed, so if you were trying to disguise the shed as something else, this would be a great design to execute that.
The front and back gable ends are covered with panels that resemble cedar shakes. After installing a metal drip cap over the 1×2 that caps the wide trim board, install the shakes according to the manufacturer’s instructions (Photo above). Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for details about panel placement and how much caulk space to leave between the panels and the trim.
This backyard barn storage shed is the perfect space to store all the essentials. Doubling as a functional space, this barn is adorable to look at. It adds class to an outdoor area and guests will surely notice this adorable mini barn sitting amid your backyard decorations. If you do not have a very large outdoor area, you can always scale down to suit your needs.

Use dimensions from Figure C (in Additional Information below) to snap lines for the peak. Then cut 2x4s to fit inside the lines and toe-screw them to the plywood to hold them in place while you fill in the center studs (Photo 1) and nail on the siding (Photo 2). Toe-screw from the outside so the screws will be accessible after the siding is installed.
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