The same thing can happen with concrete or slab bases too, because each time it rains, more and more of the hardcore is broken down as the sandier elements of the concrete are washed away (this is the same element that the rain water washes out of soil). Eventually, the same thing happens as with a compacted soil base, albeit it’s a much lengthier process. The point is though, the only way to rectify the impact the rain has had is to have the shed professionally lifted and the base built back up again.
1. Choose a location. You may have already completed this step but it’s good to put some thought into the location of your outdoor storage building. Check with your local township to make sure you follow setback guidelines. If installing next to a fence it’s a good idea to allow enough room between the shed and fence so that a person can squeeze through. Make sure the location can be accessed by your shed builder’s delivery equipment.

Test-fit the pattern rafter and adjust its notches. When it fits accurately all along the beams, use it to mark and cut the remaining rafters. First, cut all the rafters to length. Then clamp together all the rafter stock, including the pattern rafter, edge up. Mark and cut all of the notches to match the pattern rafter. Use a chisel to finish each notch.

The front and back gable ends are covered with panels that resemble cedar shakes. After installing a metal drip cap over the 1×2 that caps the wide trim board, install the shakes according to the manufacturer’s instructions (Photo above). Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for details about panel placement and how much caulk space to leave between the panels and the trim.

Studio Shed’s design philosophy does not stop at good looks. Our Signature Series and Summit Series models are designed with efficiency and performance in mind. Unlike traditional backyard sheds, we use the highest quality materials available to create spaces that perform to residential standards and meet the most stringent building codes throughout the country. A Studio Shed is an extension of your home, thoughtfully designed to maximize space, functionality, and comfort.
1. Choose a location. You may have already completed this step but it’s good to put some thought into the location of your outdoor storage building. Check with your local township to make sure you follow setback guidelines. If installing next to a fence it’s a good idea to allow enough room between the shed and fence so that a person can squeeze through. Make sure the location can be accessed by your shed builder’s delivery equipment.

I’ve always wanted to learn more about woodworking. Learn framing. Be better at picturing the insides of the walls I’m always messing with. Overall, I want to also increase my knowledge on the kinds of tools I don’t really use as much for interior DIYs (like a roofing nailer?!?! BRING IT ON!). I learned a little by volunteering in Habitat for Humanity events, but I know that there is still so much more fun stuff I could be doing and learning. So, after months of trying to think of where best to put it, what it might look like, the hoops I might have to jump through to get it, I’m going for it! I am building it from scratch (not using a shed-building kit), and I will share as I go, warts and all (and I’m sure, a few mistakes). 😃 😃 😃
The best spot for a shed is level, well-drained ground close to where you work in your garden or yard. The location doesn’t need to be perfectly flat; the foundation design shown in the plans allows for adjustments to make the floor level. Small sheds require only a top-of-soil foundation, even in locations with freezing winter temperatures. Precast concrete deck blocks work perfectly for this.
Figure G (in Additional Information below) shows details for the marking jig. Photo 12 shows how to use this setup to draw the curves for the window pieces. Next cut the side pieces (Figure F, in Additional Information below). Set the side pieces in place over the top of the header and mark the angled cuts (Photo 13). Finish the curved trim piece by first cutting the angles on each end, and then sawing the curves with a jigsaw and sanding them smooth. Use the marking jig to lay out the curved brace, too (Figure G, in Additional Information below).
For a seating area I cut 4 x 18 inch lengths of 3x3 post and I had some 12mm thick wood that I used for the seat but you could use ply board (I recommend 18mm for strength). Simply cut the ply to size then drive a screw through the ply board into the posts. Once made then use corner braces to secure in place to add that extra strength and make sure you test it out before you use it. If you are making a longer seating area then you may need more posts in the middle for support.
We are interested in a 10 x 16 shed in our backyard. We plan on putting it near an area that is slightly sloped, leading to a low spot that collects water when it rains a lot. It will not be directly in the wet area, but close. Is compacted gravel recommended for this? Is there any problem with the shed sinking? Would a concrete slab be better for stability? We are in Rochester NY, and I think the frost line is 42″.
For the shed's floor deck, use ¾-in. exterior-grade plywood; anything thinner will flex between joists. (Note that a double layer of ½-in. exterior ply is okay, too.) If you plan to store heavy items, such as a lawn tractor or woodworking machines, consider using ¾-in. tongue-and-groove plywood. This costs slightly more, and is a bit more troublesome to install, but its edges lock tightly together, creating a rock-solid, rigid floor. In areas with excessively high moisture and large numbers of wood-boring bugs--such as Florida, Alabama and the other Gulf Coast states--consider using pressure-treated plywood for the floor deck. It's particularly resistant to moisture and insects.
This whimsical garden shed looks like something you would see in a “Lord of the Rings” movie. With its almost twisting structure sitting in the middle of this forest landscape, I am almost surprised I do not see a tiny Hobbit poking about with a pipe in hand. It is a truly gorgeous setup and this just goes to show how versatile these garden sheds can be.

The photos were chosen on the basis of being unique, creative, outstanding, or exceptionally beautiful. They range from rustic to classy and from artsy to frugally-built. Some are very nature-like and blend in with what is around them while others stand out. Whatever the case, they all are meant to, in some way or an other, portray truth, beauty, and goodness.
This simple shed design features steel building siding that comes in wide sheets. These sheets allow you to cover large areas, are typically easy to put up, and are incredibly strong. You can buy new sheet metal or seek out one of the many used building material vendors in your area to help keep costs under control. Note the clear plexiglass roof and extra-large windows for additional light.
Pasadena, California, is known for its Craftsman style homes, a great number of which have been carefully preserved and restored. Owned by a University of Southern California (USC)-educated architect, Nott & Associates specializes in the Craftsman style. For a backyard shed, Nott custom designed and constructed the wooden doors, which include period-perfect details and hardware.
Turn any outdoor shed space into a space fit for a booming garden party with festive lights, such as these decorative garden lights. The bulbs hang elegantly above the heads of your guests during your next cocktail party, lighting up space and conversation with their calming glow. These string lights do not have to be so expensive, as there are so many brands and designs to choose from.

Before you shingle the roof, install metal drip edge. Then nail a row of starter shingles along the bottom of the roof. Install the rest of the shingles according to the package instructions. Before painting, we filled spaces on the exterior with acrylic caulk. Then we rolled and brushed two coats of top quality acrylic exterior paint onto the trim and siding. When all of this is done, your pub shed will be complete!


The new home and garden trend is sweeping the internet, and it's actually pretty amazing and doable. We've seen she-sheds, but this puts a different spin on making the most out of your shed. DIY bar sheds are popping up all over the place, and some of them are pretty darn creative. With a wide array of different options, this is one of the least daunting DIY home projects we've come across in a while.
Plastic shed bases are available in various colors. We sell white, black and green so the base can be as obvious, or as inconspicuous as you like. As it’s advisable that the shed’s base is larger than the floor of the shed, you can even create a decorative boarder using the pavers, filling each with either soil and grass seed, gravel or bark – other fillings can also be used but these are by far the most popular.
Strategies: It is vital to produce a degree and dried out foundation. It’s unfeasible to put with each other a get rid of whilst on an unsound basis, or else bolt holes attaching the wall structure sections won’t slide into line. For much more substantial structures especially in which the drop will be employed like a functioning region the full concrete floor base is most successful. Possessing mentioned that, typically there are two sorts of foundation ideal for an outside creating, take into account the two:
Since outdoor space is limited in a big city, everyone knows you must make smart use of vertical real estate. For a greenhouse/shed in San Francisco's Bernal Heights, Step 3 Studio designed in open-framework structure that provides shelter for a garden shed that stores potting materials and plants on the ground floor. A steel staircase was built on site, which leads to a second level surfaced in steel grid mesh. The higher elevation is the perfect spot for container plants that require more sun. It's also a nice place to hang out and enjoy views of the city, day or night.

Lay down a covering of compressed gravel about 3 inches deep. Mix the cement with ballast in a ratio of 1:5. Keep adding small quantities of water the mixture as you mix but make sure it doesn’t become too diluted. Pour the concrete into the foundation and completely fill the framework to the top. The excess of concrete can be leveled down with the edge of a timber board by using a cutting motion along the entire top of the freshly laid concrete.
Is there have a bunch of old materials laying around that could be put to good use? A few cool shed ideas, can turn even seemingly useless materials into a great backyard garden shed. Plus it can be done cheaply. With some old windows, used pallets, and even driftwood, plus a host of other retired materials, these garden shed ideas can bring your backyard garden to life.
Edrington used recycled and repurposed materials to build the shed. Restored garage doors were used for the south wall to allow light to filter through, good for seedlings. The floors are made of recycled brick on sand. A pull-down ladder leads to the second floor, where the architect built beds and tables as a cozy sleeping nook for his grandchildren. In the afternoons, Edrington and his wife enjoy a cup of tea in the shed.

Ok, now this shed absolutely looks like a tiny house! Everything about it is so adorable! This one even comes complete with quaint little flower boxes at the windows! Talk about charm and being functional! This shed brings the best of both worlds. This shed almost looks like a tiny colonial home all the way down to the tiny wreaths at the front of the door and the tiny chimney up at the top.


If you have a more rustic or natural shed setting, you should make sure to do the same with the surrounding area. Whether its flowers you want to have in the shed area, or just succulents, or a combination of both, make sure the surrounding area matches the shed space itself. Once you have both of these elements flowing, your shed will look and feel even better!
Start by setting deck blocks on the ground, positioned as shown in the plans. While the area doesn’t have to be perfectly level, you should make the ground roughly level where each block will rest. Temporarily place some straight 2-by-6 lumber on edge in the top grooves of the blocks to orient the blocks in a straight line. Arrange two rows of four blocks parallel to each other to form both long walls, then measure diagonally across the outside corners to determine how square the arrangement is. If the two long walls are parallel, and diagonal measurements taken across corners are equal, then each corner is guaranteed to be 90 degrees. Finish up by placing one deck block in the middle of each 6-foot wall after you have aligned and squared the 8-foot walls.

Thank you for visiting our blog. When we install we put them on 4×4 treated runners. You can put pavers under the runners if you choose. For more information on leveling and installing with the runners and pavers, please visit this link . As far as the gravel goes that is your preference on whether to put them down or not. Sounds like you have a good foundation! Feel free to give us a call if you have any other questions.


The “pub” part of these pub plans is a relatively new concept. Originally, I was thinking I’d add a small pop-out window to one side of my shed as a small greenhouse-type area: cover it in glass, place it on a side that gets a lot of sun, and use it to start seedlings or propagating my hydrangeas. But, after one of my regular lunches with Dad, he passed along a copy of Family Handyman that included this project, and it included a shed with one side for entertaining!

I really like the 16 x 16 Aspen and I’m currently installing my foundation and slab with a tentative purchase intent with your company. Our code here is, maximum of 256 sq. ft. shed without a permit. I’ve excavated -2′ around the perimeter and – 6″ for the pad. Right now I’m at that point of decision of concrete footer or not. I can fill my footer area with compacted 30D stone, then level the pad to grade or I could form and pour these footers which will cost a lot more bennies. I plan to frame the 16 x 16 pad for 6″ of concrete and call it a day. A few questions please; Will compacted stone under a concrete pad be sufficient for your shed? Can the shed be built without the floor in the quote if I have the concrete pad? What exact dims should that concrete pad be for your 16×16 Aspen? Thanks for your help, now back to work!
Cut the treated 6x6s to 12 ft. and set them on the gravel so they’re parallel and the outside edges are 6 ft. apart. On sloped ground, you’ll have to raise the 6×6 on the low side until it’s level with the adjacent 6×6. Do this by stacking treated 2x6s, 4x6s or 6x6s on top of the treated 6×6 to reach the right height. Use a 4-ft. or longer level to make sure the 6x6s are level and level with each other. Finally, square the 6x6s by adjusting the position of one 6×6. Slide the 6×6 back and forth, not sideways, until the diagonal measurements from opposite corners are equal. Build the platform with treated 2x6s, 24 in. on center, and cover it with treated 3/4-in. plywood (Figure B).
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