Beauty is powerful. Even in an aged setting or with old material, beauty can still ooze out. In fact sometimes the agedness enhances the beauty. This is especially true with this old shed. While its waterwheel idea and the old wood may go back years, its beauty is still worth crediting. Some of the old things in life make great garden shed ideas. IDEA: Create a garden environment with old things such as a waterwheel.
For the shed's floor deck, use ¾-in. exterior-grade plywood; anything thinner will flex between joists. (Note that a double layer of ½-in. exterior ply is okay, too.) If you plan to store heavy items, such as a lawn tractor or woodworking machines, consider using ¾-in. tongue-and-groove plywood. This costs slightly more, and is a bit more troublesome to install, but its edges lock tightly together, creating a rock-solid, rigid floor. In areas with excessively high moisture and large numbers of wood-boring bugs--such as Florida, Alabama and the other Gulf Coast states--consider using pressure-treated plywood for the floor deck. It's particularly resistant to moisture and insects.

If you have a potting shed in mind, clear corrugated fiberglass offers you a less expensive option to glass. One reason I like this particular material is its durability. Branches can hit it, even the odd football or baseball and it won't break. At the same time, it lets plenty of light in to give your spring seedlings a chance to grow before planting season.
Stand the timber upright on its edge and push and pull it backwards and forwards across the frame while dragging it from one end to the other and this will level it roughly. Next, lift the board at both ends about 4 inches above the frame and tap it back down on the frame, moving up and down the frame as you do so. Try and tap together so both ends of the board hit the frame at the same time.
Some sheds ideas take very little money, but some others are much more involved. However, that is the idea, namely, to provide ideas that match a wide range of needs and desires. The following ideas are more geared to higher spending limits. The are ideas more geared to keeping up with the Joneses. pending more money. They are the modern and classy garden shed ideas.
Are you against the idea of a treehouse because you fear for your kids’ safety? Then, here’s the solution. If you don’t want them to hate you ever since their childhood (they’ll have plenty of occasions later on), you’ll buy a nice shed and you will paint it to turn the construction into a beautiful playhouse for your children. The shed in this photo was actually turned into a playhouse for 2 little girls.
The female version of man caves are she sheds: havens to escape that can be designed and decorated in whatever style the owner desires. Inspired by a tiny hummingbird viewed nearby, this shed is aptly named Hummingbird Cottage. Lovely photos on Instagram reveal that the shed is used for art projects, as a retreat, displaying vintage pottery, and for entertaining friends. Extras like a hanging faux-crystal chandelier, potted flowering plants, wreaths, and stained glass give it a personal touch.
Many sheds come with floor bearers already fixed to the underside. These are smaller timber bearers - usually 3 x 2 inches - that run perpendicular to the timbers of your wooden frame. If yours doesn’t, it’s worth adding some (at intervals of 16 to 24 inches) to allow air to circulate and prevent damp. Just fix them to the base before you start building your shed.
Thank you for visiting our blog. Asphalt has no values worthy of anchoring a structure to since upheave on it can occur easily. I understand you are not anchoring to it but asphalt can get soft in extreme heat. Asphalt may compress unlike gravel, which once leveled, should remain solid for a shed foundation. Suggest you stay with proven fill under foundations such as a gravel intended for this use. Your local gravel supplier can recommend the size. I hope this helps answer your questions. Feel free to give us a call at 855.853.8558 if you have any other questions. Have a great day!

I even have a friend whose parents have a bar shed. They don’t call it that, and I never realized it until writing this article, but it’s the size, shape, and build of a standard shed, located near their pool. It houses all of the pool supplies, alongside a nice 4-person bar, a beer fridge, and a sizable selection of liquor. It was right in front of my eyes all this time. I just never really thought of it as a bar shed.
It is crucial to provide a level and dry foundation for garden sheds. Never assemble a shed on an unsound base otherwise, you run the risk that screw holes connecting the wall panels will not line up. For larger buildings, especially if you’re going to use the shed as a workshop, a full concrete base is your best option. However, there are three main popular types of shed base;
Before you cover the joists with the 4 x 8-ft. sheets of flooring, plumb and brace the 4×4 posts with diagonal 2x4s. Also stretch a string or mason’s line from front to back along the top edge of the outside joist to make sure the walls and joists  are straight. The attic floor needs to be square and have straight sides. If not, the rafters won’t fit correctly.

Although skids are often set directly on the ground, I prefer to lay them on a bed of gravel. The stone creates a very stable base that’s not likely to settle or wash away. Begin by laying the skids in position on the ground, then mark around each one using spray paint or flour sprinkled from a can. Move the skids out of the way, then use a flat shovel to remove the sod and about 2 in. of soil from the marked areas. Check the excavated areas to make sure they’re close to being level. If they’re not, remove a little more soil from the high spots. Next, add 3 in. to 4 in. of gravel. Compact the gravel with a hand tamper or gas-powered plate compactor, then replace the skids.
This “A” frame style shed features clapboard style roofing that will help shed rain, snow, and ice with equal ease. Instead of placing the shed flat on the ground where the wood frame could end up staying wet and rotting, the designer built a raised floor that would not only stay drier, but keep anything you store on it drier as well. When not being used for a summer camp out by your kids, it could double as a place to store your firewood.
The next step is to install the 1-in. x 9-1/4-in. trim board that fits against the soffit and runs around the perimeter of the shed and porch. This wide trim board forms one side of the false beam that runs around the porch ceiling. Add a 2×4 frame to the underside of the porch ceiling to create the false beam. Then nail the grooved panels to the porch ceiling and cover the 2×4 false beam with trim (Photo above). You can install the corner boards at this stage, but the battens will have to wait until after you’ve built and installed the windows. Figures S – V show details for the siding and trim installation.
Hello, I plan on purchasing the 16×24 two story Everest and converting into livable cabin. I am in process of demolishing dilapidated cabin currently on site and then plan on installing footer and concrete slab. There will be 1 bathroom and small kitchen on 1st floor. Do you have any recommendations for slab (4 inch vs. 6 inch)? Any thoughts on best way to run piping? Should I give slab installer any specific directions (anchors, etc.)? Does slab need to be exactly 16×24 or should it be slightly larger? Do I need to send the schematic I prepared showing location of windows and doors?
Generally, smaller sheds of up to 8×6 do not need a foundation. Small sheds can be rested on crushed stone with either treated wood foundations or concrete foundation blocks. Large sheds will need to have strong foundations. Considering Backyard Buildings smallest shed size is 8×8, all of our sheds will need a foundation setup prior to the arrival of one of our installers.
This is a shed that integrates nicely into the landscape. It has a steeply pitched roofline and resembles the angles found in birdhouses, on a larger scape of course. Even though it’s small comparative to other garden sheds we’ve seen so far, it still provides space for relaxation and entertainment but this time in the form of a very lovely space with a white picket fence and a couple of comfortable chairs.
For this reason, I am planning to run utilities to the building including natural gas, water, sewer, etc. in order to locate the sewer line for proper flow (connection location) I was hoping to have a standard footer with crawl space installed and attached the building on top of it (just like a house). This way I could access the utilities by removing sections of the floor so I could run the sewer line (and other utilities) to exact areas of the building. Is it possible to have the building constructed/attached on top of this type of footer system?
Spread the concrete evenly in the shuttering, taking particular care to push the concrete into the corners and edges. Arguably the best method to lay the concrete is to do it a layer at a time and compact it until the shuttering frame is full. Leave the concrete flush with the top of the framework and smooth it out using either a wooden or plastic float.
This “A” frame style shed features clapboard style roofing that will help shed rain, snow, and ice with equal ease. Instead of placing the shed flat on the ground where the wood frame could end up staying wet and rotting, the designer built a raised floor that would not only stay drier, but keep anything you store on it drier as well. When not being used for a summer camp out by your kids, it could double as a place to store your firewood.
Homestead Structures would be happy to help you plan and build your new outdoor bar shed. Whether you’re looking for someone to complete the structure start to finish, or you just want a bar shed kit to build yourself, our product specialists would love to help you out! Call us at 877-272-7252 or fill out the form here to discuss your backyard project.
the biggest problem I had was that the instructions I downloaded from the manufactures web site had a different cut list than the documents that came with the kits. I had already cut the lumber based on the downloaded list so I was dismayed to find that two of the lengths specified in the packaging were longer than the ones I cut from the downloaded plans. I did try assembling an arch with both specs, but nether of the lengths resulted in an arch that actually matched the frame. I wound up forcing things to fit and got the framing up, but it was much harder than it looked and you need at least three people to put it all together.
First and foremost, you will want to construct an ornate case to serve as your liquor cabinet. This should be easily accessible to whomever may be fulfilling the function of makeshift bartender. Secondly, a handcrafted station should be installed in a fashion that is inviting to all guests. L-shaped formats can help you cram in tons of extra company, but horizontal rows are equally alluring. When it comes to the counter tops, any composition will do. Just make sure the surface matches the stools.
This shed is so gorgeous it looks like some kind of fancy greenhouse. Technically, you probably could turn this shed into a greenhouse, although its primary purpose is to store things. It doesn’t really matter, though, when you have a shed that is this lovely. You could turn it into anything you want, and because of its beauty, you may want to just transform it into a recreational hall!
For me, heating with firewood is more about feeling self-sufficient than it is about lowering my utility bills. I also like cutting and splitting logs. It's good exercise and the source of my wife's wry nickname for me, the Saturday Lumberjack. But storing and keeping the wood dry is a hassle. Tarps can trap moisture, promote rot, and be difficult to remove after a snowfall. And stacking the wood inside is a poor choice, unless you enjoy the company of insects and mice.

The idea for this has been in my head for a while (and on a paper for a shorter while), but let’s face it: I need more DIY space — especially for tools and garden storage. The one-car garage I have is packed full all the time with the mower, gardening materials, woodworking tools, paint, and more. Even though I try as best I can to keep it organized(ish… meh) by cleaning it out once a year, that still means I spend a lot of time looking for the things I need in a very tight space (you would think losing things in a smaller space would be less frequent, but… nope).
This tiny red barn is so charming; you may find yourself just wanting to live in it! It looks like it could be a perfect tiny apartment or home. The outside of it is adorable, so if there is just power tools and garden tools inside, they are very lucky to have such a cute home! This is a great shed because it is small enough to remain out of sight but cute enough to want to put it in the limelight.
Test-fit the pattern rafter and adjust its notches. When it fits accurately all along the beams, use it to mark and cut the remaining rafters. First, cut all the rafters to length. Then clamp together all the rafter stock, including the pattern rafter, edge up. Mark and cut all of the notches to match the pattern rafter. Use a chisel to finish each notch.
Edrington used recycled and repurposed materials to build the shed. Restored garage doors were used for the south wall to allow light to filter through, good for seedlings. The floors are made of recycled brick on sand. A pull-down ladder leads to the second floor, where the architect built beds and tables as a cozy sleeping nook for his grandchildren. In the afternoons, Edrington and his wife enjoy a cup of tea in the shed.

The plans are OK, but I'm pretty disappointed in the customer service. I had my plans destroyed in a rain storm today and was denied any sort of replacement (was wanting a digital copy so I could re-print). Customer service indicated that they were printed only. I would assume this is to prevent people distributing them online, but it's still disappointing.


If you have a more rustic or natural shed setting, you should make sure to do the same with the surrounding area. Whether its flowers you want to have in the shed area, or just succulents, or a combination of both, make sure the surrounding area matches the shed space itself. Once you have both of these elements flowing, your shed will look and feel even better!
This backyard shed doubles as a romantic farmhouse. Unlike a typical farmhouse, this shed oozes all things romantic, from the cut out hearts to the rustic feel. It would be hard not to fall in love with this cozy little shack, as it is adorable to admire and probably even more fun to be in. This would make the perfect, quaint addition to an outdoor garden party area.
Thank you for visiting our blog. Yes, the 16×16 Aspen is a great choice as it offers lots of storage space and overall value. We would recommend footers that are slightly smaller than your typical one car garage. Considering ground movement, you definitely want that slab on a solid foundation to keep from cracking. Yes, the concrete pad can act as a floor with no wood floor needed, the bottom plate has to be a treated material. You’ll want anchor bolts placed in the concrete to place the treated plate to hold the shed to the concrete floor. THe shed is a true 16’x16′, so 192”x192″ are the dimensions. Great questions. Feel free to give us a call at 855.853.8558 if you have any other questions!

Thank you for visiting our blog. Are you using pavers as blocking or doing a large area with pavers to put your shed on? Either way, we recommend using pea gravel under pavers or blocks for drainage, then leveling by adding more blocks or pavers and avoid building leveling materials going higher than 16”. Can you describe how you are using the pavers under the shed treated floor frame?
I am planning to build a 20 X 16 shed in my yard in Brandon, FL. I want to be able to pull my truck in to work on it at times. I will be putting it on a Wood deck platform. What it the best ideas for weight support for the 5K Lb. truck? IE: 2X6s, 2X8s what type f spacing is best and which direction should the joists be going in reference to the roll up door? And help would be appreciated.
Time and time again we’ve discussed the many options available when it comes to building a shed base. We’ve gone through the pros, the cons, the aesthetically pleasing, the permanent and the portable, but we’ve never given a definitive answer on which product we consider to be best. Today, that changes, and we’ll give you the lowdown on the product we consider to be the best, based on ease of use, price, practicality and customer satisfaction.
For the shed's floor deck, use ¾-in. exterior-grade plywood; anything thinner will flex between joists. (Note that a double layer of ½-in. exterior ply is okay, too.) If you plan to store heavy items, such as a lawn tractor or woodworking machines, consider using ¾-in. tongue-and-groove plywood. This costs slightly more, and is a bit more troublesome to install, but its edges lock tightly together, creating a rock-solid, rigid floor. In areas with excessively high moisture and large numbers of wood-boring bugs--such as Florida, Alabama and the other Gulf Coast states--consider using pressure-treated plywood for the floor deck. It's particularly resistant to moisture and insects.
*Please note the content in this blog post is intended only to provide a summary and general overview on building a pallet bar. It is not intended to be comprehensive. You should refer to the instruction and safety manual of tools and paints you use and seek professional advice if unsure of how to execute the tasks before acting or relying on any of the instructions.
Need a space to unwind and relax? Turning an old shed into a spa wonderland is not that far-fetched! Space could easily be converted into an area for your hot tub or even turned into a sauna. If you have a hot tub already, it would be easy to use a shed to build a protective covering around it. If you do not have a hot tub, you can start from scratch and turn the outdoor shed into the luxury spa of your dreams!

It’s unconventional, but building the roof upside down on the platform has advantages. First, you avoid a lot of ladder work. And second, you can nail the soffit material to the overhangs easily without having to work overhead and in cramped spaces. You do have to take a little extra care to make sure the framing is square and the perimeter 2x4s are perfectly straight before nailing on the soffit, though. Start by cutting out the rafters using the pattern in Figure D (in Additional Information below) as a guide.

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