The fact that they’re lightweight also makes them really quick and simple to install. Each panel features an interlocking mechanism on each side which attaches in seconds to the other panels. Most people can expect to lay around 100 m2 of these plastic pavers in just an hour, so there’s no need for building your shed base to take up your entire day.

Plastic shed bases are available in various colors. We sell white, black and green so the base can be as obvious, or as inconspicuous as you like. As it’s advisable that the shed’s base is larger than the floor of the shed, you can even create a decorative boarder using the pavers, filling each with either soil and grass seed, gravel or bark – other fillings can also be used but these are by far the most popular.
We found all the materials to build this shed at our local home center. Most of the construction is straightforward and requires only standard carpentry tools and a circular saw. For how to build the shed windows and door, you’ll also need a table saw, power miter saw and router. We used a Kreg pocket hole jig and pocket hole screws to assemble the door and windows. With a helper or two, you could have the platform and shell built in two or three days. Then expect to spend four or five more days completing the siding, trim, doors, windows and roofing.

1. Choose a location. You may have already completed this step but it’s good to put some thought into the location of your outdoor storage building. Check with your local township to make sure you follow setback guidelines. If installing next to a fence it’s a good idea to allow enough room between the shed and fence so that a person can squeeze through. Make sure the location can be accessed by your shed builder’s delivery equipment.
Omit the bird’s-mouth from four rafters and use these on the ends. Cut the 2x4s for the ridge and subfascia to length and mark the rafter positions on them. Line up the rafters with the marks and nail through the ridge and subfascia with 16d nails to secure them. When the roof frame is complete, line up the subfascia with the chalk line on the platform and tack it in three or four places with toe screws to hold the frame straight while you install the soffit.
Very Happy the description says what's included and everything is great. There are 24 of 1 bracket type and 12 of the other. And for the cost you cant do much better. I agree with other review the instructions could be better. That being said I'm using mine a bit differently so the instructions are pointless for my case i had to make my own plans and materials list. I am using the 24 brackets for my top roofline (12 ridge beam Conectors) and purchasing other brackets from my local home improvement store to fasten my roof trusses to my own bottom framing that the 12 other connectors in the kit will be used in addition to several others being I am making a signifcantly bigger out building out of it for my car to be parked inside of. So far so good on that project and the ... full review
Also, sheds are usually made of wood. But you can change that too if you have a more elaborate plan for your garden shed. This is a particularly imposing shed with cedar-shake siding and shingles and a brick exterior, mortared stone steps and a large door with matching windows. It’s a beautiful getaway and you don’t even have to go far to reach it.

A wooden base is sufficient for most smaller sheds. It’s basically a simple wooden frame, strengthened with crossbeams, onto which you build your shed. Check the weight of your shed and its contents. If you intend to install a large garden building - anything larger than 10 x 8 feet - or store a lot of heavy equipment, consider a paving slab or concrete base instead.
Next, you will need to insert wooden shuttering or formwork around the edges of your excavated area. This will need to be made from 6"x1" timber and screwed or nailed into position. If need be, wooden pegged to form a square, level solid formwork to hold back the hardcore and concrete (in the next step). The reason for the original excavation to be 2" bigger all the way around is to take into consideration the wooden frame, you will now have an internal area of 8"x6". If you decide to use thicker timber you will need to take this into consideration at the stringing out stage. 
There are two 4×4 posts at the front of the shed that support the front half of the roof. Secure the bottom of the posts to the deck frame with metal post anchors. Tie the top of the posts together with the second (top) 2×4 plates that run over the top of the walls. Miter the ends of the 2×4 plates over the posts and attach them with screws (Photo above).

The post holes should be about 4 feet apart. Set up batter boards and mason's string to mark these points. The intersections of the string indicate the locations of a post corner. Use the 3-4-5 method described above to check for square at each intersection. Adjust the string along the batter boards as necessary and mark the location of the string on the batter boards.
First and foremost, you will want to construct an ornate case to serve as your liquor cabinet. This should be easily accessible to whomever may be fulfilling the function of makeshift bartender. Secondly, a handcrafted station should be installed in a fashion that is inviting to all guests. L-shaped formats can help you cram in tons of extra company, but horizontal rows are equally alluring. When it comes to the counter tops, any composition will do. Just make sure the surface matches the stools.
You should then lay approximately 3” (75mm) of concrete. Concrete can be produced using either bags of dry mixed concrete with small amounts of water added at a time, or making a mixture of ‘all-in’ ballast, cement and water. For this second alternative, it is mixed in the ratio of 1 part of cement for 5 parts ‘all-in’ ballast. ‘All-in’ ballast is sold in 40kg bags at most building merchants or DIY stores (Note approx 1.25 will be required to produce around 1 cubic foot of concrete). Do not allow the mix to become too wet as this will weaken the concrete.
For me, heating with firewood is more about feeling self-sufficient than it is about lowering my utility bills. I also like cutting and splitting logs. It's good exercise and the source of my wife's wry nickname for me, the Saturday Lumberjack. But storing and keeping the wood dry is a hassle. Tarps can trap moisture, promote rot, and be difficult to remove after a snowfall. And stacking the wood inside is a poor choice, unless you enjoy the company of insects and mice.

We’ve simplified the door-hanging process by mounting the door to a 1-1/2-in.-thick trim piece and then screwing the trim to the wall. An easy way to mark and cut matching hinge recesses in both the door and the trim is to clamp the trim alongside the door, making sure it extends 1/8 in. beyond the top of the door. Then mark the hinge cutout on both the door and the trim at the same time.
I really like the 16 x 16 Aspen and I’m currently installing my foundation and slab with a tentative purchase intent with your company. Our code here is, maximum of 256 sq. ft. shed without a permit. I’ve excavated -2′ around the perimeter and – 6″ for the pad. Right now I’m at that point of decision of concrete footer or not. I can fill my footer area with compacted 30D stone, then level the pad to grade or I could form and pour these footers which will cost a lot more bennies. I plan to frame the 16 x 16 pad for 6″ of concrete and call it a day. A few questions please; Will compacted stone under a concrete pad be sufficient for your shed? Can the shed be built without the floor in the quote if I have the concrete pad? What exact dims should that concrete pad be for your 16×16 Aspen? Thanks for your help, now back to work!
Crosscut the remaining joists and fasten them, as noted in the diagram, with joist hangers, joist hanger nails, 16d common nails, or 3½-inch deck screws. Crosscut the floor pieces and screw them to the long and short joists. Make yourself a small jig from scrap lumber to speed accurate spacing between each piece of flooring. Even better, make two. Place one at the front and another at the rear of each deck piece. Fasten the deck pieces with the jig in place. Lift the jigs out, position the next piece of decking, and repeat.
Hello, I plan on purchasing the 16×24 two story Everest and converting into livable cabin. I am in process of demolishing dilapidated cabin currently on site and then plan on installing footer and concrete slab. There will be 1 bathroom and small kitchen on 1st floor. Do you have any recommendations for slab (4 inch vs. 6 inch)? Any thoughts on best way to run piping? Should I give slab installer any specific directions (anchors, etc.)? Does slab need to be exactly 16×24 or should it be slightly larger? Do I need to send the schematic I prepared showing location of windows and doors?
I have a 20 x 30 Garage on skids. The main skids are running North to South. There is a 2 foot over hang on the East and West side which my walls are beginning to fall a little. I tried to place blocks underneath the garage on each corner and after 6 to 9 months the block is beginning to sink into the ground. I did not add gravel the first time. I want to do it right so I dont have to do it again. My plan is to take a small tiller and under each rafter that is running East to West to dig a hole about 8 to 10 inches wide and 12 inches deep 18 inches long and fill with gravel about 6 inches then use mason blocks or pour concrete 6 inches deep and then place 1/2 inch re-bar in an ” X ” position so that when the pressure is pushing down hopefully the re bar will help in keeping it from going downward along with the gravel helping too. I assume to do this about every 4 feet or so. Problem is I have to get the tiller close to the edge of my garage then dig til it get under the wood foundation then I can go under toward the skids. Please give me advice to learn the right way to build a foundation on a heavy Garage.
Recently there has been a push toward tiny homes. This cool shed is a great example of that. Is it small yet very classy. It simple single slant roof is one of the common features. Plus it has a very clean and minimalistic look. There is not much extra decoration on this one. IDEA: Build a tiny home in your backyard garden and use it as living quarters.

This backyard shed doubles as a romantic farmhouse. Unlike a typical farmhouse, this shed oozes all things romantic, from the cut out hearts to the rustic feel. It would be hard not to fall in love with this cozy little shack, as it is adorable to admire and probably even more fun to be in. This would make the perfect, quaint addition to an outdoor garden party area.


It’s often necessary to stack two or more solid-concrete blocks on top of one another to create a level foundation. To keep the blocks from sliding out of position as you set the floor frame in place, use a caulking gun to apply a generous bead of construction adhesive between the blocks. You can also use the adhesive to glue shims to the tops of the blocks.
Our company has been established in the outdoor building and leisure products industry since 2000. Manufacturing and delivering all our buildings from our UK site, our talented engineers are always striving to develop and improve our buildings. Our blog is full of gardening tips and tricks, as well as interior ideas, news on the latest exciting events and DIY know-how.
Spread the concrete evenly in the shuttering, taking particular care to push the concrete into the corners and edges. Arguably the best method to lay the concrete is to do it a layer at a time and compact it until the shuttering frame is full. Leave the concrete flush with the top of the framework and smooth it out using either a wooden or plastic float.

The next step is to install the 1-in. x 9-1/4-in. trim board that fits against the soffit and runs around the perimeter of the shed and porch. This wide trim board forms one side of the false beam that runs around the porch ceiling. Add a 2×4 frame to the underside of the porch ceiling to create the false beam. Then nail the grooved panels to the porch ceiling and cover the 2×4 false beam with trim (Photo above). You can install the corner boards at this stage, but the battens will have to wait until after you’ve built and installed the windows. Figures S – V show details for the siding and trim installation.
Since this is going to be a much bigger project, it will be isolated as its own series (look for “Pub Shed” as the category on posts for updates). As you guys might have seen in some of my Instagram shares or updates about the back yard, I’ve already begun the process to try to make it into a reality. More specific details (now that I’ve actually announced the first round of plans with this post) will be upcoming, including building the base (it’s not fully “in” yet, so that will have its own post when it is).
Of all the different simple shed designs, this one uses simple stacked lumber siding in which each length of board is laid edge on to the one below it and nailed in place. While this design can be quite strong, unless you seal the gaps between each board with some form of caulking, it might let the rains come in. Once your little girl grows out of it, you can turn it into a dog house, or add plexiglass windows and a door to turn it into a storage shed.
The plans showed up stapled together, with floor plans, an isometric drawing, and then half of the instructions are for the concrete pad/anchors, with alternative designs for people in wetter locales. Finally there are some pages of general materials advice. It's really a great deal, when some garage plans are 200 bucks. Those, I believe, are a bit more detailed, but then this structure is not meant to be a crazy engineering undertaking. The plans are worth the 30 dollars.
Plastic shed bases are available in various colors. We sell white, black and green so the base can be as obvious, or as inconspicuous as you like. As it’s advisable that the shed’s base is larger than the floor of the shed, you can even create a decorative boarder using the pavers, filling each with either soil and grass seed, gravel or bark – other fillings can also be used but these are by far the most popular.
The shed we built rests on a foundation made up of 12 solid-concrete blocks. The 4 x 8 x 16-in. blocks are arranged in three rows spaced 59 in. apart. These blocks are typically set directly on the ground, but we put down a 4-in. bed of gravel first because our site occasionally receives groundwater. The gravel will keep the soil beneath the shed from eroding or becoming soggy.
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