We recently removed our 12 x 10 shed due to opossums living underneath and mice making visits. We are looking at a 6 x 5 resin shed and we want it to be stable and eliminate any unwanted guests! Our plan is to have a concrete pad poured and we heard the pad should be the same size as the shed to keep water from gathering around the shed. Are we on the right track or do you have other ideas? Thanks!
Award Winning Designer, Candace Osmond has been in the industry for over a decade. She studied Interior Decorating & Design and is also an accomplished writer and multi-published author. When she's not typing away from the comforts of her desk, Candace can be found travelling to warm destinations, tending to her garden, or enjoying the outdoor haven that is her backyard. Candace currently resides in the breathtaking Maritimes of Eastern Canada with her husband, two beautiful kids and one slobbery bulldog.
This waterfront shed looks like a miniature version of a rustic lodge. The scene itself is something out of a camping or hiking magazine. The serene sky in the background just encompasses this adorable shed set right next to this impressive water element. The wooden doors accent the stone makeup of the shed and the fence in the back only complements all these elements together. A gorgeous scene, for sure!
Thanks again for reaching out to us. I spoke with our engineering department and your servicing branch. Our sheds are designed for typical storage. Transforming the shed into a livable space voids the warranty. Unfortunately, we cannot facilitate your requests. If you have any other questions, feel free to give our branch a call at (678) 797-5402. Have a great day!
First and foremost, you will want to construct an ornate case to serve as your liquor cabinet. This should be easily accessible to whomever may be fulfilling the function of makeshift bartender. Secondly, a handcrafted station should be installed in a fashion that is inviting to all guests. L-shaped formats can help you cram in tons of extra company, but horizontal rows are equally alluring. When it comes to the counter tops, any composition will do. Just make sure the surface matches the stools.
Without the correct base erecting a shed can prove very tricky. It is extremely important that all garden buildings are constructed on a firm and level base which is constructed from the correct, durable material. Assembling the base incorrectly can lead to future deterioration of the product such as doors dropping out of square, thus becoming complicated to use or causing a water leakage.
The shed we built rests on a foundation made up of 12 solid-concrete blocks. The 4 x 8 x 16-in. blocks are arranged in three rows spaced 59 in. apart. These blocks are typically set directly on the ground, but we put down a 4-in. bed of gravel first because our site occasionally receives groundwater. The gravel will keep the soil beneath the shed from eroding or becoming soggy.
Time and time again we’ve discussed the many options available when it comes to building a shed base. We’ve gone through the pros, the cons, the aesthetically pleasing, the permanent and the portable, but we’ve never given a definitive answer on which product we consider to be best. Today, that changes, and we’ll give you the lowdown on the product we consider to be the best, based on ease of use, price, practicality and customer satisfaction.

After laying out the 12 blocks, use a straight 2 x 4 and a 4-ft. level to ensure that all the blocks are level. Shim up any low blocks with strips of asphalt roofing, cedar shingles or 2-in.-thick concrete patio block. Next, form each front and rear band joist by nailing a 2 x 6 to a 2 x 8 mudsill. Set the mudsills on top of the blocks running across the front and rear of the shed. Cut a third 2 x 8 mudsill to fit along the tops of the center row of foundation blocks.


Homestead Structures would be happy to help you plan and build your new outdoor bar shed. Whether you’re looking for someone to complete the structure start to finish, or you just want a bar shed kit to build yourself, our product specialists would love to help you out! Call us at 877-272-7252 or fill out the form here to discuss your backyard project.
This foundation consists of little more than a rectangular wooden frame sitting on a gravel bed. The shed walls are built on the frame, and the entire weight of the building is transferred directly to the ground. However, the real advantage with this type of foundation is that you get to choose from a variety of flooring options. The floor area within the timber frame could be filled with gravel, concrete, crushed granite, marble chips, or slabs of bluestone or slate. Another flooring option is to nail pressure-treated 2x6s over the frame in a manner similar to that of a deck. Just keep in mind that the 2x6s must be installed before you erect the shed walls.

We are preparing to put together our new 8X6 Resign shed on our concrete slab on the side of the house. The problem we are having is that the slab dips lower towards the center for drainage. How do we go about creating a level foundation? What type of foundation would be best and or easiest? This will be both our first times doing a project like this. Any suggestions will help.


There are several ways to economize when building a shed: Install three-tab roof shingles instead of architectural shingles, or use grooved-plywood siding in place of cedar bevel siding. But don't ever skimp on the building materials used for the floor frame or plywood floor deck. I can't tell you how often I've walked into a shed and found the floor to be dangerously spongy. One building in particular had a floor so badly rotted it felt like one of those inflatable moonwalk attractions you see at carnivals.
Even though garden sheds are typically one-story structures, there’s no rule that says you can’t change that. Take this shed for example. It’s a two-level structure and the second story is a quiet and relaxing area, like a mini-bedroom. In this case, both the interior and exterior designs are elegant. The shed is infused with natural sunlight coming through the dormer window upstairs and the checkerboard tile floor adds a touch of style as well.
Once the concrete has cured, set a post on top of the footer. Use the intersection of the mason's string to set the post square. Making sure the post is plumb — and holding it straight — add concrete around the sides and cover with soil. Brace each post to keep it in position while the concrete sets. Watch our video How Do I Set a Post in Concrete? for an illustration of bracing.
Garden sheds are very common and that’s because of their multiple functionalities. They can be used for storage for all the items you no longer have room for in your house but mostly for garden supplies and tools. Also, they commonly used for hobbies. They’re like a mini-home for all your collection items and memorabilia, like a sanctuary for personal items. Moreover, garden sheds also make great workshop spaces. And since their functionality varies from person to person and from type to type, so does their design.
We are preparing to put together our new 8X6 Resign shed on our concrete slab on the side of the house. The problem we are having is that the slab dips lower towards the center for drainage. How do we go about creating a level foundation? What type of foundation would be best and or easiest? This will be both our first times doing a project like this. Any suggestions will help.
Start by setting deck blocks on the ground, positioned as shown in the plans. While the area doesn’t have to be perfectly level, you should make the ground roughly level where each block will rest. Temporarily place some straight 2-by-6 lumber on edge in the top grooves of the blocks to orient the blocks in a straight line. Arrange two rows of four blocks parallel to each other to form both long walls, then measure diagonally across the outside corners to determine how square the arrangement is. If the two long walls are parallel, and diagonal measurements taken across corners are equal, then each corner is guaranteed to be 90 degrees. Finish up by placing one deck block in the middle of each 6-foot wall after you have aligned and squared the 8-foot walls.
It's a work in progress and likely a labor of love for Rob, aka Weekend Shed Head, who chronicles the construction of his backyard man cave in Nottingham, England, on his Instagram account and YouTube channel. An experienced and enthusiastic do-it-yourselfer, he sort of makes things up as he goes along and seems to know what he's doing. Along the way, Rob posts photos of train stations, the curry dinners and full English breakfasts he cooks, and charming flowers and decor in the garden.
This year’s pub shed is one of the most versatile we’ve ever built. The bar and covered patio area make it a perfect place to entertain or just hang out. The steep roof and sturdy lofts provide tons of extra storage space. And the high-tech materials, including reflective roof sheathing and prefinished floor panels, add to the shed’s comfort and convenience. Of course, if you don’t want a bar, you can install a bank of windows in its place. In fact, without too much more work, you could eliminate the front porch and build one big shed for even more storage space
Why buy a greenhouse if you can make it yourself? Especially if it is much cheaper? A cool shed like this can be done very cheaply. The main materials needed are old replacement windows, an old door, a few pieces of wood for rafters, and some polycarbonate roofing sheets. IDEA: Rather than throwing away your old windows, door, and other materials, turn them into a greenhouse shed.
The roof truss can be built using 2x4 or 2x6 lumbers. There are different ways to build the truss, the most common is cutting out the rafters and assembling them using gussets. The easiest way to build the roof truss will be using plans. The other option will be to lay the 2x4’s or 2x6’s on the level floor set them how you want your roof and make a template. Once you are happy with the look of your template you can build the rest.
We assembled each layer with pocket screws before gluing the two layers together, but if you don’t own a pocket hole setup, you could simply screw through the overlapping boards instead. Complete the door frame. Then cut the 4 x 8-ft. grooved plywood to fit the lower recess, and cut a piece of 1/4-in. acrylic sheet to fit the upper recess. Secure the plywood and acrylic sheet with 1/2-in. x 1/2-in. moldings nailed to the inside. Sand the edges of the door flush.
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