Typically, lean to sheds are a structure that you would not want to attach permantly to say your garage or other part of your house! Why? Well, damage can be caused to your permanent structure due to shifting and the like, and also attaching a structure to your home will require you to get a permit (you may have to anyway!) but anything you build that you attach to your home most typically requires a permit.
Complete the siding, then remove the toe-screws and move the wall aside to make room for constructing the opposite wall. Use the same chalk line template and process to build the opposite end wall. Figure C (in Additional Information below) shows framing details for the front wall. Mark the curves on the 2×10 header pieces using the trammel setup shown in Photo 12 and Figure G (in Additional Information below). Cut them with a jigsaw. When you’re done building the front and back walls, set them aside so you can use the platform to build the roof sections.

You should then lay approximately 3” (75mm) of concrete. Concrete can be produced using either bags of dry mixed concrete with small amounts of water added at a time, or making a mixture of ‘all-in’ ballast, cement and water. For this second alternative, it is mixed in the ratio of 1 part of cement for 5 parts ‘all-in’ ballast. ‘All-in’ ballast is sold in 40kg bags at most building merchants or DIY stores (Note approx 1.25 will be required to produce around 1 cubic foot of concrete). Do not allow the mix to become too wet as this will weaken the concrete.
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In order to building a shed, depending on where you are located you may or may not be required to obtain a building permit. A building permit is required so a certified inspector by the town/city/municipality can inspect the construction of the shed to ensure it meets regulations for safety, spacial requirements, and visually. This information can be found by either visiting the town/city/municipality website or contacting the town/city/municipality by phone.
Did you always want to dine outside? Well, this is your chance. Although it looks a bit like a box of matches, this space may be exactly what your yard lacks. It is obviously not suitable for storage and it’s not available as a building kit but it sure adds some elegance to your backyard. It’s not very cheap either, but this depends on the contractor.
There are a few styles of pier blocks available, including one that has a square hole molded into the top through which a vertical 4×4 post can be inserted. Another type has a flat wood block set into the top so you can toenail a joist in place. For building shed foundations, I prefer to use Dek-Block piers. Each block measures 8 in. high by 11 in. sq. and weighs about 45 lbs. Molded into the top surface are a 3 1/2-in.-sq. recessed socket and a pair of 1 1/2-in.-wide slots. The socket accepts a 4×4 post; the slots are used to support a 2x floor joist. Because Dek-Block piers can accept either a joist or a post, they can be used on very uneven sites and badly sloping terrain.
Just because you are using a garden shed, it does not mean that you cannot fancy it up! This gorgeous garden shed is the essence of luxury. The purple flowers just pop against that alabaster fence and shed. This is an adorable coffee area and definitely, a place you could sit and feel comfortable having some morning conversation in. The foliage in this scene definitely adds more class to the décor.

Dig trenches about 12 in. wide and about 10 in. below where you want the bottom edge of the joists to end up. Pour 4 in. of gravel into the trenches and level it off. Make sure the gravel in all three trenches is at the same height. Then cut the 6x6s to 12 ft. long and set them in the trenches. Measure to make sure  the 6x6s are parallel. Then measure diagonally from the ends of the outside 6x6s to make certain they’re square. The diagonal measurements should be equal. Finally, level the 6x6s (Photo above and Figure B in project pdfs).
a. Begin by pounding in the first corner stake. Tie a string to the stake and stretch it out to the other corner. Mark the string at 4’ from the stake. Tie another string to the stake and stretch it to the other corner. Mark that string at 3’ from the stake. If the measurement from one mark on the string to the other is 5’ then your corner is square. You’re now ready to install the remaining three stakes. Here is an illustration to show how the 3/4/5 method works.

When you’ve decided on a shed location, dig two trenches 16 in. wide, 12 in. deep and 13 ft. long. Center the trenches 66 in. apart. Fill the trenches with a 3-in. layer of gravel and compact it with a hand tamper. Repeat this process until the trench is full. Use a level and long board to level the top layer of gravel. If the ground is flat, also make sure the gravel beds in the two trenches are level with each other.
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