Start by setting deck blocks on the ground, positioned as shown in the plans. While the area doesn’t have to be perfectly level, you should make the ground roughly level where each block will rest. Temporarily place some straight 2-by-6 lumber on edge in the top grooves of the blocks to orient the blocks in a straight line. Arrange two rows of four blocks parallel to each other to form both long walls, then measure diagonally across the outside corners to determine how square the arrangement is. If the two long walls are parallel, and diagonal measurements taken across corners are equal, then each corner is guaranteed to be 90 degrees. Finish up by placing one deck block in the middle of each 6-foot wall after you have aligned and squared the 8-foot walls.
My name is Farhan Ahsan,I am web enthusiast, writer and blogger. I always strive to be passionate about my work. I started my work at the beginning of 2007 by engaging myself with detail reading and exchanging information with others. Since then things and times have changed, but one thing remains the same and that is my passion for helping and educating people, building a successful blog and delivering quality content to the readers. I always love to write about gardening, sustainable life, off grid living and homestead farming.
I am building a 20 a 20 foot floor for a workshop in a space under my house so the area is always dry. There is already a crushed stone floor. Can I dig a trench, fill it with stone and lay 4×4’s or 2×4’s on top of it for a foundation? If so, would they have to be pressure treated? Do I even need crushed stone if use pressure treated wood on top of dirt Would concrete blocks or pavers with 2×6 headers be a better idea? Which is the least expensive way to go?
The wooden portabase is a time and cost saving base perfect for garden sheds. The portabase is constructed from timber and comes in a range of sizes to suit different garden buildings. The base features spikes on each corner; these spikes can be sunk into the ground offering a stable base for a garden building. You will need to ensure the ground you install your portabase onto is level otherwise your building could end up getting damaged.
This simple shed design features steel building siding that comes in wide sheets. These sheets allow you to cover large areas, are typically easy to put up, and are incredibly strong. You can buy new sheet metal or seek out one of the many used building material vendors in your area to help keep costs under control. Note the clear plexiglass roof and extra-large windows for additional light.
Start by cutting the 2×8 ridge board to length and marking the rafter locations on both sides using Figure K as a guide. Also mark the rafter locations on the floor along both sides of the shed. Next, set the ridge on temporary 2×4 posts and brace it with diagonal 2x4s (Photo above). The top of the ridge should be 76 in. from the floor. Cut a pair of rafters (Figure J) and set them in place to test the fit. Make any needed adjustments, and when you have a pair of rafters that fit perfectly, mark one of them as a pattern. Use the pattern to trace the rafter cuts on the remaining 2x6s and cut out the rafters.

Well, not these plans. You have the option of building a very functional and spacious lean-to shed on different foundations. Your foundation choices are: concrete slab, a wooden floor supported by concrete piers, or a wooden floor supported by skids. That lost option also means that your lean-to could be mobile as well so you won’t have to decide where you want to permanently put it.
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