If you do not have a lot of bulky gardening equipment, but would still like to protect and store your standard tools, acquiring a smaller shed may be the best bet for you. This convenient space will provide shelter for all the gardening essentials and will help you keep all your tools organized. What a great feeling to know that all your tools are going to be organized within the same space and you do not have to go out and hunt for them all.
Figure A (above) and Figure E (in Additional Information below) show how to build a shed and the exterior trim details. Start by mounting the brackets. Line up the outside edges of the lower brackets with the face of the siding, push them tight to the soffit and screw them to the wall. Center the top bracket on the peak and push it tight to the soffit. Starting with the pieces that go under the brackets, wrap the corners with the corner board. Overlap the front corner board onto the side corner board (Figure E, in Additional Information below).

The best spot for a shed is level, well-drained ground close to where you work in your garden or yard. The location doesn’t need to be perfectly flat; the foundation design shown in the plans allows for adjustments to make the floor level. Small sheds require only a top-of-soil foundation, even in locations with freezing winter temperatures. Precast concrete deck blocks work perfectly for this.


Shed foundations fall into two basic categories: on-grade and frost-proof. On-grade foundations (sometimes called “floating foundations” — that’s this kind, not this kind) sit right on the ground and are sufficient for all but the very largest outbuildings. They’re also the quickest and simplest to build because they don’t require you to dig deep holes or pour concrete footings or piers. On-grade foundations are usually made of pressure-treated lumber or solid-concrete blocks.

The plastic pro base is a lightweight and eco-friendly alternative to a concrete base. It is simply to install, simply level the ground and lay down the weed proof membrane and connect the grids together. The pro base comes as a kit featuring individual tiles, which fit together to make a base. The kit also features a permeable membrane, which allows water to drain away while preventing weeds from growing through.
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Set up a levelled formwork. This involves measuring, cutting and fitting timber to the shape of the base in order to contain the concrete. Check diagonal measurements to ensure the formwork is square and level as this will determine whether your shed base is 100% sturdy. Next, spread a layer ofwell-compactedd hardcore (all-in ballast or crushed gravel) and cover with a liberal amount of sand. This needs be well compacted and flattened down, preferably with a compacting tool or roller.
There are several ways to economize when building a shed: Install three-tab roof shingles instead of architectural shingles, or use grooved-plywood siding in place of cedar bevel siding. But don't ever skimp on the building materials used for the floor frame or plywood floor deck. I can't tell you how often I've walked into a shed and found the floor to be dangerously spongy. One building in particular had a floor so badly rotted it felt like one of those inflatable moonwalk attractions you see at carnivals.
Stand the back wall. Then align the corner of the side and back walls and nail them together. With a helper on the outside of the shed to push if necessary, line up the inside edge of the bottom plate with the chalk line and nail it to the platform. Continue around the building, standing the opposite end wall and finally the front wall. Nail the corners together, making sure that the top plates of adjoining walls are flush with each other.
Door placement is also important. You often see doors placed on the gable end of the building, which looks nice, but makes it virtually impossible to reach items stored at the rear of the shed. A better alternative is to put the door on the long side wall, so that you'll be able to access items to the right, left and back. Another option is to install doors on both gable-end walls, so that you'll be able to easily reach items from either end of the shed.

If you're like most people, your shed is probably a little hut in your backyard that you don't think about much—a tiny eyesore filled with rusty tools, boxes full of junk and other knick knacks.  Which is why we're loving that home owners are starting to repurpose these forgotten storage spaces into something awesome: tiny bars located in their very own backyard.
Time and time again we’ve discussed the many options available when it comes to building a shed base. We’ve gone through the pros, the cons, the aesthetically pleasing, the permanent and the portable, but we’ve never given a definitive answer on which product we consider to be best. Today, that changes, and we’ll give you the lowdown on the product we consider to be the best, based on ease of use, price, practicality and customer satisfaction.
For a seating area I cut 4 x 18 inch lengths of 3x3 post and I had some 12mm thick wood that I used for the seat but you could use ply board (I recommend 18mm for strength). Simply cut the ply to size then drive a screw through the ply board into the posts. Once made then use corner braces to secure in place to add that extra strength and make sure you test it out before you use it. If you are making a longer seating area then you may need more posts in the middle for support.
We built inexpensive windows for the shed using plastic barn sash mounted in 1×4 pine frames (Photo above and Figure Q and R). Start by measuring the sash and building a 1×4 frame that’s 1/4 in. wider and taller than the sash. Cut 10-degree angles on the bottom of the sides to provide a sloping sill. Cut 1×2 stops to fit in the frame and position them to hold the sash flush with the outside edge of the 1×4 frame. Then attach galvanized screen door hinges to the frame, set the sash in place and drill holes for the fasteners. Since the plastic isn’t strong enough to hold wood screws, we drilled holes through the sash and attached the hinges with machine screws, washers and nuts.
Time and time again we’ve discussed the many options available when it comes to building a shed base. We’ve gone through the pros, the cons, the aesthetically pleasing, the permanent and the portable, but we’ve never given a definitive answer on which product we consider to be best. Today, that changes, and we’ll give you the lowdown on the product we consider to be the best, based on ease of use, price, practicality and customer satisfaction.

Building a 12×20 shed. Thinking about using 2×8 floor joints and rim board with the joists setting on 6×6 pt timbers tucked under the long 20′ sides with a 20′ 4×6 running parallel in the center. There would be support blocks at the 4 corners and in the center of the 12′ width. Then also in the middle of the three 20′ runs. Total of 9 support blocks altogether with them setting on gravel base ground. Does this sound like a good plan to you?
Ordering a prehung wood door like this from the lumberyard could cost as much as $1,000, but you can build one suitable for a shed at a fraction of the cost. We purchased clear pine at a home center and spent $120 for the boards. Photos 8 – 10 show how to build the door and mount it to a trim piece with hinges. The door consists of two layers of 3/4-in.-thick boards that overlap at the corners to add strength. Rip 1×6 boards to 4-1/2 in. on a table saw for the outside layer (Figure F, Additional Information below).
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Without the correct base erecting a shed can prove very tricky. It is extremely important that all garden buildings are constructed on a firm and level base which is constructed from the correct, durable material. Assembling the base incorrectly can lead to future deterioration of the product such as doors dropping out of square, thus becoming complicated to use or causing a water leakage.
The roof truss can be built using 2x4 or 2x6 lumbers. There are different ways to build the truss, the most common is cutting out the rafters and assembling them using gussets. The easiest way to build the roof truss will be using plans. The other option will be to lay the 2x4’s or 2x6’s on the level floor set them how you want your roof and make a template. Once you are happy with the look of your template you can build the rest.
After crosscutting the steel roof panels, we fastened them to the skip sheathing using self-tapping screws with a rubber gasket under the head. We drove the screws with an 18-volt drill and a socket wrench attachment, but we'd advise using a more sturdy nut driver because penetrating the roofing requires a fair amount of force. Finally, we screwed the diagonal braces to the posts.
The female version of man caves are she sheds: havens to escape that can be designed and decorated in whatever style the owner desires. Inspired by a tiny hummingbird viewed nearby, this shed is aptly named Hummingbird Cottage. Lovely photos on Instagram reveal that the shed is used for art projects, as a retreat, displaying vintage pottery, and for entertaining friends. Extras like a hanging faux-crystal chandelier, potted flowering plants, wreaths, and stained glass give it a personal touch.
Simple shed designs like this one feature tongue and groove planks that are typically reserved for flooring or indoor paneling. The boards are designed to interlock along the long edges, making for an exceptionally sturdy structure. The best part is you can buy this type of lumber at your local discount hardware superstore in different lengths and a variety of different types of lumber.
Figure G (in Additional Information below) shows details for the marking jig. Photo 12 shows how to use this setup to draw the curves for the window pieces. Next cut the side pieces (Figure F, in Additional Information below). Set the side pieces in place over the top of the header and mark the angled cuts (Photo 13). Finish the curved trim piece by first cutting the angles on each end, and then sawing the curves with a jigsaw and sanding them smooth. Use the marking jig to lay out the curved brace, too (Figure G, in Additional Information below).
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