In a Vero Beach, Florida, midcentury modern neighborhood, Sanders Pace Architecture retained the lines and essence of the original house while redesigning it for their client's 21st-century lifestyle. Although it's at the front of the house and initially might resemble a garage, the detached "shed" can be used as a private studio or for guests. Because it's located on the coast, hurricane-proof doors were needed, but cedar was installed over them for an attractive but sturdy structure.
While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy & effectiveness of the information displayed on this website, the Ugly Duckling House is for entertainment purposes only. All tutorials and demonstrations are not intended to be professional advice (nor substitute as such), and I make no guarantees as to the procedures and information here. Creating with my suggested methods, materials, and tools is under your own risk. Please ensure you are following proper guidelines with anything used, and seek professional advice if you don’t know how to do something! Read my complete disclosure here.
Plastic shed bases are available in various colors. We sell white, black and green so the base can be as obvious, or as inconspicuous as you like. As it’s advisable that the shed’s base is larger than the floor of the shed, you can even create a decorative boarder using the pavers, filling each with either soil and grass seed, gravel or bark – other fillings can also be used but these are by far the most popular.

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Instead of a garden shed or a tool shed, why not make one of these outdoor structures a workspace? This old-fashioned country shed is excessively gorgeous to just store tools in! Just look at it! From the rustic roof to the adorable side room, this space is a place of inspiration. I can see a writer using this space to draw inspiration from for the latest best-selling novel or simply using it as a space for reflection.
I’ve been looking at building a tiny house out of (2) 12×16 barn sheds I want to have the sheds install on top of a 2′ concrete foundation wall to allow a second story loft. I’m not sure if I need footings they will be at right angles to each other separated at the corners by 3 to 4 feet I could send you a floor plan of my design and see what you think
Also, sheds are usually made of wood. But you can change that too if you have a more elaborate plan for your garden shed. This is a particularly imposing shed with cedar-shake siding and shingles and a brick exterior, mortared stone steps and a large door with matching windows. It’s a beautiful getaway and you don’t even have to go far to reach it.
This interesting cube-shaped building is definitely not a shed. Not the way the builder used slats on three sides to provide plenty of ventilation for those evening meals in the great outdoors. Note that the entire back wall is solid to help keep the weather out, you could add outdoor curtains to help block any excess breezes and keep out the rains. What a great way to create your own outdoor family room!
We’ve simplified the door-hanging process by mounting the door to a 1-1/2-in.-thick trim piece and then screwing the trim to the wall. An easy way to mark and cut matching hinge recesses in both the door and the trim is to clamp the trim alongside the door, making sure it extends 1/8 in. beyond the top of the door. Then mark the hinge cutout on both the door and the trim at the same time.

Dig trenches about 12 in. wide and about 10 in. below where you want the bottom edge of the joists to end up. Pour 4 in. of gravel into the trenches and level it off. Make sure the gravel in all three trenches is at the same height. Then cut the 6x6s to 12 ft. long and set them in the trenches. Measure to make sure  the 6x6s are parallel. Then measure diagonally from the ends of the outside 6x6s to make certain they’re square. The diagonal measurements should be equal. Finally, level the 6x6s (Photo above and Figure B in project pdfs).
In addition to common building materials that you’ll find at most home centers and lumberyards, we used some special products from Louisiana-Pacific (in-depth material details in project pdfs below) that you may have to order if you want to duplicate our pub shed exactly. The windows are shop built using plastic utility window sash that we found at a local home center. Search for “barn sash” online if you can’t find it locally. The swing-up bar door is site built. The entry door on the side is a standard prehung exterior door that’s readily available at most home centers (about $220). The materials for the pub shed cost us about $6,500.
Of all the different simple shed designs, this one uses simple stacked lumber siding in which each length of board is laid edge on to the one below it and nailed in place. While this design can be quite strong, unless you seal the gaps between each board with some form of caulking, it might let the rains come in. Once your little girl grows out of it, you can turn it into a dog house, or add plexiglass windows and a door to turn it into a storage shed.
P.S. Hurricane/Tropical Storm Irma hit my area and knocked out power, downed a few trees, blocked my neighborhood’s entrance, etc. but the UDH was thankfully fine. I just have a few extra downed limbs to chop up for the new fire pit. I hope those of you impacted are, above all, safe — including your pets. And I’ll be saying a prayer for those who weren’t as lucky. Thanks for those of you who have sent comments my way via social media. 💜
For me, heating with firewood is more about feeling self-sufficient than it is about lowering my utility bills. I also like cutting and splitting logs. It's good exercise and the source of my wife's wry nickname for me, the Saturday Lumberjack. But storing and keeping the wood dry is a hassle. Tarps can trap moisture, promote rot, and be difficult to remove after a snowfall. And stacking the wood inside is a poor choice, unless you enjoy the company of insects and mice.
There are a few styles of pier blocks available, including one that has a square hole molded into the top through which a vertical 4×4 post can be inserted. Another type has a flat wood block set into the top so you can toenail a joist in place. For building shed foundations, I prefer to use Dek-Block piers. Each block measures 8 in. high by 11 in. sq. and weighs about 45 lbs. Molded into the top surface are a 3 1/2-in.-sq. recessed socket and a pair of 1 1/2-in.-wide slots. The socket accepts a 4×4 post; the slots are used to support a 2x floor joist. Because Dek-Block piers can accept either a joist or a post, they can be used on very uneven sites and badly sloping terrain.
If you have a potting shed in mind, clear corrugated fiberglass offers you a less expensive option to glass. One reason I like this particular material is its durability. Branches can hit it, even the odd football or baseball and it won't break. At the same time, it lets plenty of light in to give your spring seedlings a chance to grow before planting season.
Before you cover the joists with the 4 x 8-ft. sheets of flooring, plumb and brace the 4×4 posts with diagonal 2x4s. Also stretch a string or mason’s line from front to back along the top edge of the outside joist to make sure the walls and joists  are straight. The attic floor needs to be square and have straight sides. If not, the rafters won’t fit correctly.
This tiny office space is perfect for those times you need to get away and focus on some important work. Whether you are a work-from-home person or an individual that has a freelance side gig, it is always great to have a space that is just for you and getting your work done. Once you have created this space, your mindset will automatically be in work mode every time you enter it.
When building a solid-concrete block foundation, it’s important that all the blocks be level. However, it’s equally important that the blocks in each row be perfectly aligned. The best — and fastest — way to line up the blocks is with a taut string. Install the first and last block in each row. Then stretch a length of mason’s line along the edge of the two end blocks and use it as a guide to set the intermediate blocks..

Start by setting deck blocks on the ground, positioned as shown in the plans. While the area doesn’t have to be perfectly level, you should make the ground roughly level where each block will rest. Temporarily place some straight 2-by-6 lumber on edge in the top grooves of the blocks to orient the blocks in a straight line. Arrange two rows of four blocks parallel to each other to form both long walls, then measure diagonally across the outside corners to determine how square the arrangement is. If the two long walls are parallel, and diagonal measurements taken across corners are equal, then each corner is guaranteed to be 90 degrees. Finish up by placing one deck block in the middle of each 6-foot wall after you have aligned and squared the 8-foot walls.


These sheds are perfect for small yards where space is scarce. If you plan on storing large items inside, make sure to install double doors. On the other hand, if you want to design it like a very small office, one door is enough. Lean-to sheds are generally used for storing tools like nails, screws, electric drills, gardening equipment etc., basically anything that fits. Lean-to sheds can be placed in close proximity to your house or other existing structure.
Since outdoor space is limited in a big city, everyone knows you must make smart use of vertical real estate. For a greenhouse/shed in San Francisco's Bernal Heights, Step 3 Studio designed in open-framework structure that provides shelter for a garden shed that stores potting materials and plants on the ground floor. A steel staircase was built on site, which leads to a second level surfaced in steel grid mesh. The higher elevation is the perfect spot for container plants that require more sun. It's also a nice place to hang out and enjoy views of the city, day or night.
Ambitious recyclers build sheds from existing materials, like doors, reclaimed lumber, windows, and the ever-popular crates. If you are on a tight budget but really want a shed, research the DIY projects featured on social media, in books, and home and garden websites like The Spruce. Whatever you decide, try to follow through with the project. You don't need the added stress of a half-finished shed every time you walk out your back door.
Thank you for visiting our blog. That sounds like a fun and quite rewarding project. Sounds like the scope of your project exceeds what we offer. We manufacture sheds (shells) and build them on site. However, we do not customize them to be living spaces. Unfortunately, we I can’t help answer your question. Please let me know if you have any other questions.
In a Vero Beach, Florida, midcentury modern neighborhood, Sanders Pace Architecture retained the lines and essence of the original house while redesigning it for their client's 21st-century lifestyle. Although it's at the front of the house and initially might resemble a garage, the detached "shed" can be used as a private studio or for guests. Because it's located on the coast, hurricane-proof doors were needed, but cedar was installed over them for an attractive but sturdy structure.

Concrete requires 3” (7.5 cm) of compacted hardcore (all-in ballast or other crushed rubble/gravel) underneath the 3″ concrete layer. The base can be level with the ground or raised above it. If you want it to be level, excavate the top earth to 6” (15 cm), to allow for the hardcore layer and 3” (7.5 cm) of concrete. Level the area with a rake and spade and remove the pegs.

This is nothing flashy or classy. Its paint is peeling, its roof is rusting, and its luster is gone. It looks drab to the eye looking for the latest and the greatest. However there remains some beauty. It may be hidden to the modern eye, but it is still there. It speaks of the glories of time past. It has the revered gothic style windows with their inspiring, curved and pointed arch. The roof has a delightfully rustic look that speaks of something that has been around for a long time and deserves to be cherished. The paint may be old and peeling but it is not meaningless. Rustic garden sheds may be old but they speak of having weathered many storms. This is aged beauty that will not disappear right away. So for the first IDEA: Reuse and enjoy oldness rather than getting rid of it.


When you’ve decided on a shed location, dig two trenches 16 in. wide, 12 in. deep and 13 ft. long. Center the trenches 66 in. apart. Fill the trenches with a 3-in. layer of gravel and compact it with a hand tamper. Repeat this process until the trench is full. Use a level and long board to level the top layer of gravel. If the ground is flat, also make sure the gravel beds in the two trenches are level with each other.
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