This simple shed is framed using 2 x 4s and then covered in sheets of pre-grooved plywood to help keep costs under control. When all you are doing is building a tool storage shed, a design such as this is strong enough to handle snow and ice, yet light enough that you can move it around your yard. Note that the owner used the framework to install tool hangers and that he added a single window for light.
This year’s pub shed is one of the most versatile we’ve ever built. The bar and covered patio area make it a perfect place to entertain or just hang out. The steep roof and sturdy lofts provide tons of extra storage space. And the high-tech materials, including reflective roof sheathing and prefinished floor panels, add to the shed’s comfort and convenience. Of course, if you don’t want a bar, you can install a bank of windows in its place. In fact, without too much more work, you could eliminate the front porch and build one big shed for even more storage space
a. Begin by pounding in the first corner stake. Tie a string to the stake and stretch it out to the other corner. Mark the string at 4’ from the stake. Tie another string to the stake and stretch it to the other corner. Mark that string at 3’ from the stake. If the measurement from one mark on the string to the other is 5’ then your corner is square. You’re now ready to install the remaining three stakes. Here is an illustration to show how the 3/4/5 method works.

And since we started with a simple shed, we’re going to finish in the same tone. This cute garden shed has a very lovely, simple and clear look. It’s made with prefab wall panels and doors and windows that slip into precut openings, making the building process very quick and easy. Then all you have to go id decorate it with hanging baskets and boxes and add beautiful plants.


Factor in size, because a really small shed probably won't be ideal for a bar. Think about how many people you plan to host on a regular basis, as well as your ideal seating (stools take up less room than a booth). Keep in mind that your local building department might have a size restriction on backyard sheds built without a permit. Around 120 square feet is usually a safe bet.
Door placement is also important. You often see doors placed on the gable end of the building, which looks nice, but makes it virtually impossible to reach items stored at the rear of the shed. A better alternative is to put the door on the long side wall, so that you'll be able to access items to the right, left and back. Another option is to install doors on both gable-end walls, so that you'll be able to easily reach items from either end of the shed.
We assembled each layer with pocket screws before gluing the two layers together, but if you don’t own a pocket hole setup, you could simply screw through the overlapping boards instead. Complete the door frame. Then cut the 4 x 8-ft. grooved plywood to fit the lower recess, and cut a piece of 1/4-in. acrylic sheet to fit the upper recess. Secure the plywood and acrylic sheet with 1/2-in. x 1/2-in. moldings nailed to the inside. Sand the edges of the door flush.
It is crucial to provide a level and dry foundation for garden sheds. Never assemble a shed on an unsound base otherwise, you run the risk that screw holes connecting the wall panels will not line up. For larger buildings, especially if you’re going to use the shed as a workshop, a full concrete base is your best option. However, there are three main popular types of shed base;

When you’ve decided on a shed location, dig two trenches 16 in. wide, 12 in. deep and 13 ft. long. Center the trenches 66 in. apart. Fill the trenches with a 3-in. layer of gravel and compact it with a hand tamper. Repeat this process until the trench is full. Use a level and long board to level the top layer of gravel. If the ground is flat, also make sure the gravel beds in the two trenches are level with each other.
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