Studio Shed’s design philosophy does not stop at good looks. Our Signature Series and Summit Series models are designed with efficiency and performance in mind. Unlike traditional backyard sheds, we use the highest quality materials available to create spaces that perform to residential standards and meet the most stringent building codes throughout the country. A Studio Shed is an extension of your home, thoughtfully designed to maximize space, functionality, and comfort.
A concrete base is the most common type of base for garden buildings and are relatively easy to build, but most people will hire a reputable builder to install the base. A concrete base must be installed in advance of receiving you garden building, this ensures the base has properly set before the building is installed. If the base has not properly set a build up of condensation can form within your new garden building.
If you don’t already have a garden shed, but wish you did, take a look at the sheds shown here. Whether you want a simple utilitarian structure for storing tools and equipment, a workspace for potting, a playhouse for kids, a fanciful focal point for outdoor living, or something in between, you’re sure to find inspiration in these photos posted by members of our sibling site FineHomebuilding.com. Click on the links below to see more photos of these structures.
Generally, smaller sheds of up to 8×6 do not need a foundation. Small sheds can be rested on crushed stone with either treated wood foundations or concrete foundation blocks. Large sheds will need to have strong foundations. Considering Backyard Buildings smallest shed size is 8×8, all of our sheds will need a foundation setup prior to the arrival of one of our installers.
This backyard barn storage shed is the perfect space to store all the essentials. Doubling as a functional space, this barn is adorable to look at. It adds class to an outdoor area and guests will surely notice this adorable mini barn sitting amid your backyard decorations. If you do not have a very large outdoor area, you can always scale down to suit your needs.
Phase # two: A concrete floor foundation calls for 3 inches (7.five centimetres) of compressed hard main beneath the three inches (7.5 centimetres) cement layer. The foundation could be degree utilizing the soil or rose over it. If it’s to become degree dig deep into the leading component soil to six inch (15 centimetres) permitting for your tough core coating and 3 inches (7.5 centimetres) depth of concrete.
The idea for this has been in my head for a while (and on a paper for a shorter while), but let’s face it: I need more DIY space — especially for tools and garden storage. The one-car garage I have is packed full all the time with the mower, gardening materials, woodworking tools, paint, and more. Even though I try as best I can to keep it organized(ish… meh) by cleaning it out once a year, that still means I spend a lot of time looking for the things I need in a very tight space (you would think losing things in a smaller space would be less frequent, but… nope).
Many sheds come with floor bearers already fixed to the underside. These are smaller timber bearers - usually 3 x 2 inches - that run perpendicular to the timbers of your wooden frame. If yours doesn’t, it’s worth adding some (at intervals of 16 to 24 inches) to allow air to circulate and prevent damp. Just fix them to the base before you start building your shed.

4. Lay out your 4" x 4" skids properly spaced and lined up on your foundation, making sure they are level. Set the floor frame on top of the skids and measure the diagonals to make sure it's square. At this point, toe nail all joists to your skids using 16d common nails. The joists which fall at the 4', 8', and 12' lengths along your skids should be measured before nailing to make sure they are nailed exactly on center at those distances. This way,
It's obvious that the designer who created simple shed designs like this one wanted to create an outdoor place to relax out of the sun and weather. The simple 2×4 framing and plywood sheathing add an interesting and low-cost touch. But, it’s the owner's use of a pair of sliding glass doors that make this shed so special. Here again, you could save money by sourcing many of the materials such as the doors from a local salvage dealer.
Disclaimer: Please note that this guide is intended to present general information regarding the subject. All information indicated are representative and not exhaustive, which means that the results may vary depending on your item, its size, complexity and other circumstances. This is only advice and we do not accept responsibility for any problems you may have whilst following this guide, it is only a representation and not a definitive guide. When in doubt, please ask your manufacturer before proceeding.
The new home and garden trend is sweeping the internet, and it's actually pretty amazing and doable. We've seen she-sheds, but this puts a different spin on making the most out of your shed. DIY bar sheds are popping up all over the place, and some of them are pretty darn creative. With a wide array of different options, this is one of the least daunting DIY home projects we've come across in a while.
A Place to Grow recycles greenhouses to create she sheds, wine rooms, art studios, and meditation retreats. For a client in Los Osos, California, a shed is used as a sewing room and private escape. When designing studios and hobby sheds, allow room for shelving, storage, and workspace. Naturally, the space will need to be wired for proper lighting.
This wooden shed could be mistaken for a tiny house. With all the decorative trim, you just need a few flower boxes at the windows to actually make this functional storage shed into an actual house! From the grey and white paint to the adorably scalloped edging, this shed is great as a standalone piece due to all the detail. In other words, this shed is adorable enough to make your whole backyard look great.
If you have a router, use a hinge-mortising bit (or straight bit) to cut the hinge recesses (Photo 10). Otherwise, use a sharp chisel. Screw the hinges to the door and trim. To hang the door, line up a temporary 2×4 with the bottom of the siding and screw it to the wall. Then rest the door on the 2×4 and drive 3-in. screws through the trim into the framing to hold the door in place (Photo 11). Finish the door installation by adding the top and side trim pieces.
So it's not surprising that people often ask me for advice about putting together a backyard storage building. Sometimes I get asked questions that I couldn't possibly answer: "Do you think my husband and brother-in-law can build me a garden shed?" Or, "Would an 8 x 10-ft. shed be big enough to store all my stuff?" Gee, ma'am, I couldn't say. But often, the questions have something to do with shed design, framing or siding options. There, I can help. And so with these inquisitive souls in mind I present my favorite tricks of the shed trade.
Of all the different simple shed designs, this one uses simple stacked lumber siding in which each length of board is laid edge on to the one below it and nailed in place. While this design can be quite strong, unless you seal the gaps between each board with some form of caulking, it might let the rains come in. Once your little girl grows out of it, you can turn it into a dog house, or add plexiglass windows and a door to turn it into a storage shed.
It's a work in progress and likely a labor of love for Rob, aka Weekend Shed Head, who chronicles the construction of his backyard man cave in Nottingham, England, on his Instagram account and YouTube channel. An experienced and enthusiastic do-it-yourselfer, he sort of makes things up as he goes along and seems to know what he's doing. Along the way, Rob posts photos of train stations, the curry dinners and full English breakfasts he cooks, and charming flowers and decor in the garden.

On top of this, check that the best location in your garden allows the easiest access, including the side of the shed in order to apply treatment to your shed. Have a visual image in your head; you may not want to carry heavy objects to and from the bottom of your garden. For our summerhouses, you may want to consider whereabouts in your garden there is the best access to natural light or even the best view.


Here is a nifty idea for a backyard shed. Use it for all your power tools, gardening essentials, and even lawnmowers. A shed like this is a great way to protect backyard items that you do not want to lose due to common weathering wear and tear. These tools, especially the more expensive tools such as the lawnmower, will be protected no matter the season and will promote the longevity of your equipment.
If the building site is high and dry, you can set the blocks directly on the ground. However, if there’s any chance that rain runoff will occasionally drain under the shed, you’ll need to use a shovel to remove a patch of grass under each block, compact the soil with a hand tamper, then cover the exposed dirt with 2 in. or 3 in. of gravel before setting the blocks. The gravel bed will ensure that the soil beneath the blocks won’t wash away or become soggy.
Pasadena, California, is known for its Craftsman style homes, a great number of which have been carefully preserved and restored. Owned by a University of Southern California (USC)-educated architect, Nott & Associates specializes in the Craftsman style. For a backyard shed, Nott custom designed and constructed the wooden doors, which include period-perfect details and hardware.

It's obvious that the designer who created simple shed designs like this one wanted to create an outdoor place to relax out of the sun and weather. The simple 2×4 framing and plywood sheathing add an interesting and low-cost touch. But, it’s the owner's use of a pair of sliding glass doors that make this shed so special. Here again, you could save money by sourcing many of the materials such as the doors from a local salvage dealer.

Using wooden pegs and string, mark out the exact base size required, being careful to measure both diagonals in order to get the area square. The is area can now be excavated to a depth of 3". This depth can vary depending on the thickness of slab used and the gradient of the ground excavated. Overall you're looking to achieve a thickness of 4-5cm of sand/cement mix and the slab on top.
This country garden shed not only offers a covered space to pretty much do whatever you’d like with, but it adds so much character to the scene. You can easily set up chairs and table to create an adorable place to sit and have your morning coffee while reading the paper. It is a conversation piece and even a conversation space if you were to utilize it that way.
This is nothing flashy or classy. Its paint is peeling, its roof is rusting, and its luster is gone. It looks drab to the eye looking for the latest and the greatest. However there remains some beauty. It may be hidden to the modern eye, but it is still there. It speaks of the glories of time past. It has the revered gothic style windows with their inspiring, curved and pointed arch. The roof has a delightfully rustic look that speaks of something that has been around for a long time and deserves to be cherished. The paint may be old and peeling but it is not meaningless. Rustic garden sheds may be old but they speak of having weathered many storms. This is aged beauty that will not disappear right away. So for the first IDEA: Reuse and enjoy oldness rather than getting rid of it.
Our company has been established in the outdoor building and leisure products industry since 2000. Manufacturing and delivering all our buildings from our UK site, our talented engineers are always striving to develop and improve our buildings. Our blog is full of gardening tips and tricks, as well as interior ideas, news on the latest exciting events and DIY know-how.
If there’s even the slightest chance that you may someday want to move your shed to another location, make the job easier by modifying the skids before you set them in place. Start by trimming off the bottom corners of the skids at a 45-degree angle so they’ll slide more easily over the ground. Also, bore a 1 1/2-in.-dia. hole about 4 in. from each end. That way, you’ll have a convenient place to hook up a tow chain or steel cable.

Instead of a garden shed or a tool shed, why not make one of these outdoor structures a workspace? This old-fashioned country shed is excessively gorgeous to just store tools in! Just look at it! From the rustic roof to the adorable side room, this space is a place of inspiration. I can see a writer using this space to draw inspiration from for the latest best-selling novel or simply using it as a space for reflection.


After crosscutting the steel roof panels, we fastened them to the skip sheathing using self-tapping screws with a rubber gasket under the head. We drove the screws with an 18-volt drill and a socket wrench attachment, but we'd advise using a more sturdy nut driver because penetrating the roofing requires a fair amount of force. Finally, we screwed the diagonal braces to the posts.
I’ve looked into it, and reviewed the rules for what my county requires and also called the county’s code office to ask them questions. The main issue is whether or not the structure is considered “permanent” or not. I’ll get into that in more detail on a future post but you’re ABSOLUTELY RIGHT about checking to make sure you have everything you need before you start!
Turn any outdoor shed space into a space fit for a booming garden party with festive lights, such as these decorative garden lights. The bulbs hang elegantly above the heads of your guests during your next cocktail party, lighting up space and conversation with their calming glow. These string lights do not have to be so expensive, as there are so many brands and designs to choose from.
I placed the screws about 8 inches apart throughout the layout of the floor.  For the plywood ends that butt up against each other, I install two screws on each piece exactly next to each other.  I then used some of the leftover dirt I had and back filled the sides of the frame.  Finally, I tamped the edges with my hand tamper at a slight angle so water will deflect away from the floor.
If you don’t already have a garden shed, but wish you did, take a look at the sheds shown here. Whether you want a simple utilitarian structure for storing tools and equipment, a workspace for potting, a playhouse for kids, a fanciful focal point for outdoor living, or something in between, you’re sure to find inspiration in these photos posted by members of our sibling site FineHomebuilding.com. Click on the links below to see more photos of these structures.
You can make shelves using blocks that are left over when you dismantle the pallets and you could use left over pallet wood or ply wood.  I used some old decking off cuts. Drill two blocks on to the wall – good to use a spirit level to get these straight, then lay the pallet wood/ply wood/decking cut to size on top and screw the shelf onto the blocks.
Figure G (in Additional Information below) shows details for the marking jig. Photo 12 shows how to use this setup to draw the curves for the window pieces. Next cut the side pieces (Figure F, in Additional Information below). Set the side pieces in place over the top of the header and mark the angled cuts (Photo 13). Finish the curved trim piece by first cutting the angles on each end, and then sawing the curves with a jigsaw and sanding them smooth. Use the marking jig to lay out the curved brace, too (Figure G, in Additional Information below).
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