The wooden portabase is a time and cost saving base perfect for garden sheds. The portabase is constructed from timber and comes in a range of sizes to suit different garden buildings. The base features spikes on each corner; these spikes can be sunk into the ground offering a stable base for a garden building. You will need to ensure the ground you install your portabase onto is level otherwise your building could end up getting damaged.
A wooden base is sufficient for most smaller sheds. It’s basically a simple wooden frame, strengthened with crossbeams, onto which you build your shed. Check the weight of your shed and its contents. If you intend to install a large garden building - anything larger than 10 x 8 feet - or store a lot of heavy equipment, consider a paving slab or concrete base instead.
This nifty shed sits on the back of the property instead of near the front. This way, the shed is out of the way since it is purely a functional shed. No chance of having a party in this joint since its excessively busy storing all the garden essentials. It even has a collection space for chopped wood, which is another cool way to use a garden shed.
This is another example of surroundings that fit with the garden shed. Actually, it would be more accurate to say that the shed blends and fits with its surroundings. The dark colors blend with the woody area and the darker mulch. The green trim has enough of green to connect at least somewhat with the greenery around it. IDEA # 27: Make your shed blend with nature instead of change the natural setting to fit your shed.

You should then lay approximately 3” (75mm) of concrete. Concrete can be produced using either bags of dry mixed concrete with small amounts of water added at a time, or making a mixture of ‘all-in’ ballast, cement and water. For this second alternative, it is mixed in the ratio of 1 part of cement for 5 parts ‘all-in’ ballast. ‘All-in’ ballast is sold in 40kg bags at most building merchants or DIY stores (Note approx 1.25 will be required to produce around 1 cubic foot of concrete). Do not allow the mix to become too wet as this will weaken the concrete.
The plans showed up stapled together, with floor plans, an isometric drawing, and then half of the instructions are for the concrete pad/anchors, with alternative designs for people in wetter locales. Finally there are some pages of general materials advice. It's really a great deal, when some garage plans are 200 bucks. Those, I believe, are a bit more detailed, but then this structure is not meant to be a crazy engineering undertaking. The plans are worth the 30 dollars.
Concrete starts to harden and set about two hours after it has been mixed, so it must be laid, tamped (packed down) and given its finish within that time. Divide large areas into bays or sections which can be completed one at a time before they begin to set. You can walk on the concrete after three days and remove the formwork after five days (but as always, check any product instructions for the mix you are using as there are rapid-setting options available).
I’m looking at putting a 10 x 12 shed in our back yard (Michigan). I’m wondering what would be recommended – if anything – for a base. It looks like, from the installation process photos, that the builder will assemble the foundation and can put that directly onto the grass. Our ground is level enough – within the 6″ required – so I don’t think that would be an issue. It sounds like – from what i am reading – that I wouldn’t NEED to do anything to prepare in terms of putting down stone or anything. Is that correct?

This fantastic outdoor space has been termed the “She-Shed” due to its high function and feeling of being a getaway. You do not need to make space a specific space for women, but in this case, the shed is meant to resemble a sort of “man cave” for the opposite sex. When it comes down to it, you can decorate a shed in any way you feel comfortable and even turn it into a working studio or office space.
You’ll need standard DIY tools including a circular saw and drill to build this pub shed. A framing nail gun and compressor will speed up the framing. Since there’s a lot of trim and siding to nail up, we used a coil siding nailer loaded with galvanized ring-shank siding nails. You can rent a coil siding nail gun like this for about $30 a day. A miter saw and table saw aren’t required but will make your cuts more accurate. This is a big pub shed, but it’s no more complicated than a small one. If you have experience with deck building or other small carpentry projects, you shouldn’t have any trouble finishing this pub shed. There are a lot of materials to cut and hoist, though, so you’ll want to round up a few helpers. Expect to spend five or six weekends completing the pub shed.
The female version of man caves are she sheds: havens to escape that can be designed and decorated in whatever style the owner desires. Inspired by a tiny hummingbird viewed nearby, this shed is aptly named Hummingbird Cottage. Lovely photos on Instagram reveal that the shed is used for art projects, as a retreat, displaying vintage pottery, and for entertaining friends. Extras like a hanging faux-crystal chandelier, potted flowering plants, wreaths, and stained glass give it a personal touch.
This shed studio is the perfect place for relaxing, getting some work done, or even living in! Tiny homes are all the rage these days, and what better way to construct a tiny home than utilizing a refurbished garden shed. Not only is the space so cost-effective, but it can really be a great little space if you know how to work with the area well. It could turn out to be a fun project!
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Do not purchase materials or attempt to build this shed project unless you have studied the information provided thoroughly, and have verified all dimensions and material requirements for yourself. Also verify that the plans conform to local building codes and practices. Although every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information and design, the user is ultimately responsible for the use of this information. All information provided is copyrighted and cannot be duplicated without the permission of Shedking. 
Since this is going to be a much bigger project, it will be isolated as its own series (look for “Pub Shed” as the category on posts for updates). As you guys might have seen in some of my Instagram shares or updates about the back yard, I’ve already begun the process to try to make it into a reality. More specific details (now that I’ve actually announced the first round of plans with this post) will be upcoming, including building the base (it’s not fully “in” yet, so that will have its own post when it is).
Even though garden sheds are typically one-story structures, there’s no rule that says you can’t change that. Take this shed for example. It’s a two-level structure and the second story is a quiet and relaxing area, like a mini-bedroom. In this case, both the interior and exterior designs are elegant. The shed is infused with natural sunlight coming through the dormer window upstairs and the checkerboard tile floor adds a touch of style as well.
If you're like most people, your shed is probably a little hut in your backyard that you don't think about much—a tiny eyesore filled with rusty tools, boxes full of junk and other knick knacks.  Which is why we're loving that home owners are starting to repurpose these forgotten storage spaces into something awesome: tiny bars located in their very own backyard.

This open concept garden shed almost looks like a farmhouse. The open area would be perfect as a gathering area for guests or partygoers for your next backyard soiree. The super cute furnishings make this space absolute charming and it would be hard to pass up the opportunity to sit in this adorable, tiny space. This is a great space to utilize storage and double as an entertainment venue for later.
So it's not surprising that people often ask me for advice about putting together a backyard storage building. Sometimes I get asked questions that I couldn't possibly answer: "Do you think my husband and brother-in-law can build me a garden shed?" Or, "Would an 8 x 10-ft. shed be big enough to store all my stuff?" Gee, ma'am, I couldn't say. But often, the questions have something to do with shed design, framing or siding options. There, I can help. And so with these inquisitive souls in mind I present my favorite tricks of the shed trade.
If there’s even the slightest chance that you may someday want to move your shed to another location, make the job easier by modifying the skids before you set them in place. Start by trimming off the bottom corners of the skids at a 45-degree angle so they’ll slide more easily over the ground. Also, bore a 1 1/2-in.-dia. hole about 4 in. from each end. That way, you’ll have a convenient place to hook up a tow chain or steel cable.
If your prehung door has exterior trim, pry it off. The wide trim board running around the shed, under the soffit, will take the place of the top door trim. Place the door in the opening to check the fit. The top doorjamb should rest against the wide trim board. Use wooden or composite shims between the side jambs and the 2×4 framing to square the door frame. Place shims behind each hinge and at the top, middle and bottom of the latch side. Adjust the shims until there’s an even space between the door and the doorjambs on the top and sides. Then drive screws through the doorjambs into the framing at the shim locations to secure the door.
This lean-to shed features clapboard style siding which is not only easy to install but provides exceptional resistance to rain, wind, and snow. While you can build your shed from brand-new lumber, you could also opt to save money by building your shed from used lumber. The doors appear to be made from tongue and groove lumber but could also be made from pre-grooved plywood sheets that give the same appearance for far less money.

This “A” frame style shed features clapboard style roofing that will help shed rain, snow, and ice with equal ease. Instead of placing the shed flat on the ground where the wood frame could end up staying wet and rotting, the designer built a raised floor that would not only stay drier, but keep anything you store on it drier as well. When not being used for a summer camp out by your kids, it could double as a place to store your firewood.


This “A” frame style shed features clapboard style roofing that will help shed rain, snow, and ice with equal ease. Instead of placing the shed flat on the ground where the wood frame could end up staying wet and rotting, the designer built a raised floor that would not only stay drier, but keep anything you store on it drier as well. When not being used for a summer camp out by your kids, it could double as a place to store your firewood.
Dig trenches about 12 in. wide and about 10 in. below where you want the bottom edge of the joists to end up. Pour 4 in. of gravel into the trenches and level it off. Make sure the gravel in all three trenches is at the same height. Then cut the 6x6s to 12 ft. long and set them in the trenches. Measure to make sure  the 6x6s are parallel. Then measure diagonally from the ends of the outside 6x6s to make certain they’re square. The diagonal measurements should be equal. Finally, level the 6x6s (Photo above and Figure B in project pdfs).
Now that the floor is completed you can assemble the wall frame on the leveled floor. You can build the wall frames using 2x4 lumbers. The top and bottom 2x4’s are called plates. Place the 2x4 wall studs 16-24 inches apart and nail through the plates and into the wall studs. While the wall frame is still on the ground you can install the siding to make it easier. When the wall is completed rise up and nail it into the floor.

In a Vero Beach, Florida, midcentury modern neighborhood, Sanders Pace Architecture retained the lines and essence of the original house while redesigning it for their client's 21st-century lifestyle. Although it's at the front of the house and initially might resemble a garage, the detached "shed" can be used as a private studio or for guests. Because it's located on the coast, hurricane-proof doors were needed, but cedar was installed over them for an attractive but sturdy structure.


This shed features plenty of glass to let the sun shine in. Note that it even has windows in the end gables for even more light. The use of both metal and clapboard siding gives this outdoor shed the look of a tiny home, which may help it blend into your backyard more easily. The double glass doors are perfect for letting in more cooling air or large items. This shed would make a great outdoor studio for the artist in the family.

It’s often necessary to stack two or more solid-concrete blocks on top of one another to create a level foundation. To keep the blocks from sliding out of position as you set the floor frame in place, use a caulking gun to apply a generous bead of construction adhesive between the blocks. You can also use the adhesive to glue shims to the tops of the blocks.
Using Figure C as a guide (in project pdfs below), chalk lines on the floor to indicate the inside edges of the walls. These lines provide a reference for straightening the bottom plate of the walls after the walls are standing. Cut the top and bottom wall plates and mark the stud locations on them (Figures D – G, also in project pdfs). Build the side walls (Photo above) of the pub shed. Then build and stand the front and back walls. Brace them temporarily.
Typically, lean to sheds are a structure that you would not want to attach permantly to say your garage or other part of your house! Why? Well, damage can be caused to your permanent structure due to shifting and the like, and also attaching a structure to your home will require you to get a permit (you may have to anyway!) but anything you build that you attach to your home most typically requires a permit.
When building a solid-concrete block foundation, it’s important that all the blocks be level. However, it’s equally important that the blocks in each row be perfectly aligned. The best — and fastest — way to line up the blocks is with a taut string. Install the first and last block in each row. Then stretch a length of mason’s line along the edge of the two end blocks and use it as a guide to set the intermediate blocks..
This tiny shed looks a little more like an old English phone booth than a shed thanks to the glass door. But it definitely looks bigger on the inside. If you look closely, the walls of this shed appear to have been made from exterior grade doors. Not only can this save you a lot of money in supplies, it looks very cool and should be very strong. You can pick up used doors at any building salvage store or your local Habitat for Humanity Store.
Stand the back wall. Then align the corner of the side and back walls and nail them together. With a helper on the outside of the shed to push if necessary, line up the inside edge of the bottom plate with the chalk line and nail it to the platform. Continue around the building, standing the opposite end wall and finally the front wall. Nail the corners together, making sure that the top plates of adjoining walls are flush with each other.
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