This backyard barn storage shed is the perfect space to store all the essentials. Doubling as a functional space, this barn is adorable to look at. It adds class to an outdoor area and guests will surely notice this adorable mini barn sitting amid your backyard decorations. If you do not have a very large outdoor area, you can always scale down to suit your needs.
This is one of the bigger (and more costly) DIYs I’ve ever wanted to do, so I’m going to have some first-time learning curves ahead. Also, obviously, it’s something I’ve had to save up for. If you’ve noticed the increase in my sponsored projects on the site over the last few months, this is one of the main reasons I’ve taken them on (the summer is usually when I wind up working with more sponsors, so I wanted to funnel some of that to immediately start planning for this!). I’ve already seen what the kinds of costs are to have one custom built by ordering, so I’m hoping the DIY is also going to be more budget-friendly.

I just retired, had some spare time, and needed a garage large enough to store my stuff and small enough to not require a building permit in Boise Idaho. The 16x12' model fit the bill. I ignored the bulk materials list and bought lumber in groups small enough to fit in my Ranger pickup. I cut and nailed the trusses first, then the walls, then with help of my son-in-law (a carpenter) we stood it up on the foundation I had dug but my son-in-law had poured. It came out exactly 12' by 16' just by following the measurements given! Wow. My first project was a success, thanks to these plans. I used french doors instead of the single man-door, and two windows instead of the one. Overhead Door installed the garage door.


This garden hut shed is practically growing into the scenery. The hut is sheer nature, as depicted by the garden growing off the roof of the structure. This shed has undoubtedly been in this surrounding for a while, but that does not diminish the function of it. If anything, the charm of this shed surpasses the time this tiny shed has probably spent on this hillside.


P.S. Hurricane/Tropical Storm Irma hit my area and knocked out power, downed a few trees, blocked my neighborhood’s entrance, etc. but the UDH was thankfully fine. I just have a few extra downed limbs to chop up for the new fire pit. I hope those of you impacted are, above all, safe — including your pets. And I’ll be saying a prayer for those who weren’t as lucky. Thanks for those of you who have sent comments my way via social media. 💜
Start by setting deck blocks on the ground, positioned as shown in the plans. While the area doesn’t have to be perfectly level, you should make the ground roughly level where each block will rest. Temporarily place some straight 2-by-6 lumber on edge in the top grooves of the blocks to orient the blocks in a straight line. Arrange two rows of four blocks parallel to each other to form both long walls, then measure diagonally across the outside corners to determine how square the arrangement is. If the two long walls are parallel, and diagonal measurements taken across corners are equal, then each corner is guaranteed to be 90 degrees. Finish up by placing one deck block in the middle of each 6-foot wall after you have aligned and squared the 8-foot walls.
So it's not surprising that people often ask me for advice about putting together a backyard storage building. Sometimes I get asked questions that I couldn't possibly answer: "Do you think my husband and brother-in-law can build me a garden shed?" Or, "Would an 8 x 10-ft. shed be big enough to store all my stuff?" Gee, ma'am, I couldn't say. But often, the questions have something to do with shed design, framing or siding options. There, I can help. And so with these inquisitive souls in mind I present my favorite tricks of the shed trade.
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So it's not surprising that people often ask me for advice about putting together a backyard storage building. Sometimes I get asked questions that I couldn't possibly answer: "Do you think my husband and brother-in-law can build me a garden shed?" Or, "Would an 8 x 10-ft. shed be big enough to store all my stuff?" Gee, ma'am, I couldn't say. But often, the questions have something to do with shed design, framing or siding options. There, I can help. And so with these inquisitive souls in mind I present my favorite tricks of the shed trade.
Remember small amounts of water should be added at a time, and mixed into the concrete. Be careful as excessive amounts may make the cement too sloppy and it needs to stay reasonably dry. Spread the concrete evenly and slightly above the formwork. This can be then levelled off with a long straight edge of timber resting on the formwork. Use a sawing motion slowly over the entire surface of the freshly laid concrete.
This structure is quite different from all the sheds presented so far. First of all, it’s not actually a shed but just a structure with a design similar to that of a shed but one that you can walk right through. Still, it’s perfect for storing garden tools in and it has a simple, rustic charm. The image is completed by the stone path leading to this pseudo-shed.

The roof panels are heavy and a bit awkward, so round up three strong helpers for this part of the job. Move the panels into position and lean them against the front and back walls. Then set up ladders inside the building for two helpers and push one of the panels up to them. Slide the panel up the roof until the bird’s-mouths drop over the top plate of the wall.
If you have a router, use a hinge-mortising bit (or straight bit) to cut the hinge recesses (Photo 10). Otherwise, use a sharp chisel. Screw the hinges to the door and trim. To hang the door, line up a temporary 2×4 with the bottom of the siding and screw it to the wall. Then rest the door on the 2×4 and drive 3-in. screws through the trim into the framing to hold the door in place (Photo 11). Finish the door installation by adding the top and side trim pieces.
This is a very beautiful shed and it matches the main house that was originally designed by J. Merrill Brown back in 1887. In fact, it’s like a miniature version of the main residence. The colors chosen for the exterior are simple but beautiful and the roof is charming as well. It has a very chic look and it’s like an updated, more elegant version of the shed presented above.
We built inexpensive windows for the shed using plastic barn sash mounted in 1×4 pine frames (Photo above and Figure Q and R). Start by measuring the sash and building a 1×4 frame that’s 1/4 in. wider and taller than the sash. Cut 10-degree angles on the bottom of the sides to provide a sloping sill. Cut 1×2 stops to fit in the frame and position them to hold the sash flush with the outside edge of the 1×4 frame. Then attach galvanized screen door hinges to the frame, set the sash in place and drill holes for the fasteners. Since the plastic isn’t strong enough to hold wood screws, we drilled holes through the sash and attached the hinges with machine screws, washers and nuts.
Check with your local building department to see whether a permit is required. Also find out if there are rules about where your pub shed can be located on the lot. Take the Materials List (in the project pdfs below) with you to your favorite lumberyard or home center and go over the list with the salesperson to see what items you may have to order. Then set up a delivery so you’ll be ready to build the pub shed when your help arrives. A few days before you plan to dig, call 811 for instructions on how to locate buried utility lines. Now it’s time to start building your pub shed.
Stand the back wall. Then align the corner of the side and back walls and nail them together. With a helper on the outside of the shed to push if necessary, line up the inside edge of the bottom plate with the chalk line and nail it to the platform. Continue around the building, standing the opposite end wall and finally the front wall. Nail the corners together, making sure that the top plates of adjoining walls are flush with each other.
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